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Elementary STEM Education

Meet Students and Alumni

If you are thinking about applying to our program and would like to talk with one of our current students or alumni, feel free to email those who have included their contact information below.

Current Students
Madeleine Gibson (contact me)

After working in after-school settings, summer programs and special education, my desire to be an elementary educator continued to grow. The STEM Elementary Education program caught my attention because of its emphasis on using student thinking to drive engaging and successful teaching. At Tufts, I am in an academic space where my love of science and discovery are valued and integrated into a rigorous and deeply powerful year of teacher training.

I graduated from the University of Vermont in 2013 with a B.S in Environmental Studies and a minor in English.
Marie Zhang (contact me)

After teaching math at an adult technical school for two years, I came to deeply believe in the importance of nurturing character development, growth mindsets, and mathematical reasoning in children.

This masters program affords me the opportunity to ask questions, to challenge my preconceptions, to widen my knowledge base, and to adopt new perspectives before I reenter the teaching profession.

I graduated from Boston University in 2014 with a B.S. in Mathematics Education.
 
Alumni
Matthew Burch (contact me)
MAT Elementary STEM Education, 2013

I am currently a fifth grade math and science teacher at the West Somerville Neighborhood School in Somerville, MA.

The Tufts Elementary STEM program provided a unique and enlightening perspective on the teaching profession, particularly in its focus on the STEM disciplines within the elementary grades. Tufts' prepared me to not only create lessons and teach students, but to also manage discussions, critically analyze student work, and meet the individual needs of all my students.
Erin Taylor (contact me)
MAT Elementary STEM Education, 2014

I work as a Garden Coordinator at CitySprouts, an organization that runs school gardens in Cambridge and Boston. My job is to maintain four school gardens, and to help teachers use them as curricular supports. I work with preK-8 teachers, helping them use the garden and experiential outdoor education to deepen their lessons and give all students an opportunity to be successful. In the summer, I run a garden internship site for middle schoolers. They learn gardening and cooking skills; do a service learning project; and study the interrelationship among healthy bodies, healthy ecosystems, and healthy communities.

The program manages to both zoom in on understanding student thinking, and zoom out to see that thinking in the context of what school is and can be. I see the impact of my time at Tufts coming through in my work all the time when I hear myself asking questions aimed at pushing kids to be scientists, observers, and examiners of the world. I think that a central tension of trying to be a good educator is the following question: to what extend do we prepare students for the world that exists versus the world that, with their help, we hope to create? My professors and classmates at Tufts were constantly wrestling with that tension and trying to strike a balance.