The X-ray Sun

The X-ray Sun

. If our eyes could see X-ray radiation, then the Sun would look something like this. Million-degree gas is constrained within ubiquitous magnetic loops, giving rise to bright X-ray emission from active regions. Relatively faint magnetic loops connect active regions to distant areas on the Sun, or emerge within quiet regions away from active ones. The extended corona rings the Sun, and dark coronal holes are found at its poles (top and bottom). This image was taken on 8 May 1992 with the Soft X-ray Telescope (SXT) onboard the Yohkoh mission; it has been corrected for instrumental effects and processed to enhance solar features. (Yohkoh is a project of international cooperation between the Japanese Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS) and NASA. The SXT was prepared by the Lockheed-Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, and the University of Tokyo with the support of NASA and ISAS.)

Copyright 2010, Professor Kenneth R. Lang, Tufts University