Fig4_5 Proton proton collision

Fig4_5 Proton proton collision

Fig. 4.5 . Two beams of protons have been whirled in opposite directions to nearly the speed of light, each with an energy of 7 trillion electron volts, or 7 TeV = 7 x 1012 eV = 1.12 x 10-6 J, and directed into collision with each other at CERN’s Large Hadron Collider, abbreviated LHC. This image displays the tracks of more than 100 charged particles as they fly away from the point of proton collision. By studying the collision particle debris, including correlations between them, scientists hope to gain an improved knowledge of how sub-atomic particles interact at extremely high energies, including the hot, dense conditions just a small fraction of a second after the big bang. At the point of proton impact, temperatures of more than million million, or 1012, K are generated, exceeding 100,000 times the temperature at the center of the Sun. In particle physics, a hadron is a composite particle made of quarks held together by the strong force; the best-known hadrons are the protons and neutrons, which are components of atomic nuclei. CERN is a French acronym for the Conseil Européen pour la Recherche Nucléaire, or the European Organization for Nuclear Research. The Compact Muon Solenoid, abbreviated CMS, particle detector created this image. (Courtesy of CERN.)

Copyright 2010, Professor Kenneth R. Lang, Tufts University