New red spots on Jupiter

New red spots on Jupiter

Fig. 9.3 . Some of the turbulent eddies in Jupiterís atmosphere move from west to east (left to right) above Jupiterís Great Red Spot (center), a giant high-pressure anti-cyclone that swirls in the opposite counter-clockwise direction. Some small eddies are sucked into the great red vortex, helping to sustain it, while other eddies roll around the perimeter, probably reinforcing the stormís circulation. Although the Great Red Spot has been observed for at least three centuries, a new red spot appeared in the spring of 2006 and in 2008 a white oval-shaped storm turned into a third, smaller red spot. The small red oval (left) will either be absorbed or repelled by the Great Red Spot when it moves into it, but the other, lower latitude red spot, which lies between the other two, will most likely pass the Great Red Spot unhindered. This visible-light image was taken on 9-10 May 2008 from the Hubble Space Telescope. (Courtesy of NASA/ESA/Mike Wong and Imke de Pater, U. C. Berkeley.)

Copyright 2010, Professor Kenneth R. Lang, Tufts University