12. Asteroids and meteorites

Fig. 12.1.
Trojan asteroids
Fig. 12.2.
Near-Earth asteroids
Fig. 12.3.
Kirkwood gaps in asteroid orbits
Fig. 12.4.
Chaotic asteroid orbit
Fig. 12.5.
Asteroid families
Fig. 12.6.
Dwarf planet – asteroid 1 Ceres
Fig. 12.7.
Finding the composition of asteroids
Fig. 12.8.
Asteroid distribution of spectral type with distance
Fig. 12.9.
How fast do asteroids spin?
Fig. 12.10.
Asteroid 2867 Steins
Fig. 12.11.
Asteroid 253 Mathilde
Fig. 12.12.
Asteroid 433 Eros, a solid rock
Fig. 12.13.
Craters on asteroid 433 Eros
Fig. 12.14.
Back in the saddle again
Fig. 12.15.
The south saddle of Eros
Fig. 12.16.
Close-up view of the surface of 433 Eros
Fig. 12.17.
Asteroid 25143 Itokawa, a rubble pile
Fig. 12.18.
Fireball
Fig. 12.19.
Antarctica
Fig. 12.20.
Stony meteorite
Fig. 12.21.
Chondrules in Allende
Fig. 12.22.
Achondrite meteorite
Fig. 12.23.
Meteorite orbits
Fig. 12.24.
Widmanstätten pattern
Fig. 12.25.
Interplanetary objects
Fig. 12.26.summary
Summary Diagram
Fig. 12.1.
Fig12_1 Milky Way
Fig. 12.2.
Fig12_2 Globula_clusters
Fig. 12.3.
Fig12_3 Edge on Milky Way
Fig. 12.4.
Fig12_4 Spiral arms of the Milky Way
Fig. 12.5.
Fig12_5 Structure of our stellar system
Fig. 12.6.
Fig12_6 Supermassive blackhole at center of Milky Way
Fig. 12.7.
Fig12_7Spiral_shape_M51.jpg
Fig. 12.8.
Fig12_8 Andromeda Nebula
Fig. 12.9.
FIg12_9 Spiral galaxy
Fig. 12.10.
Fig12_10 Discovery expanding universe
Fig. 12.11.
Fig12_11 Hubble diagram
Fig. 12.12.
Fig12_12 Inside coma cluster
Fig. 12.13.
Fig12_13 Galaxy cluster lens
Fig. 12.14.
Fig12_14 Abell 2218
Fig. 12.15.
Fig12_15 Einstein rings
Fig. 12.16.
Fig12_16 Colliding galaxies
Fig. 12.17.
Fig12_17 Sloan great wall
Fig. 12.18.
Fig12_18Cosmic_web.jpg

Copyright 2010, Professor Kenneth R. Lang, Tufts University