11. Uranus and Neptune

Fig. 11.1.
The tilted planet
Fig. 11.2.
Bands and vortex in the atmosphere of Uranus
Fig. 11.3.
Neptune’s dynamic atmosphere
Fig. 11.4.
Neptune’s stormy disposition
Fig. 11.5.
Radius-mass relations
Fig. 11.6.
Inside Uranus and Neptune
Fig. 11.7.
Discovery of the thin rings of Uranus
Fig. 11.8.
The rings of Uranus
Fig. 11.9.
Rings and small satellites of Uranus
Fig. 11.10.
Rings on edge
Fig. 11.11.
Neptune’s rings
Fig. 11.12.
Miranda
Fig. 11.13.
Neptune’s odd satellites
Fig. 11.14.
Triton, the largest moon of Neptune
Fig. 11.15.
Smooth and bumpy terrain on Triton
Fig. 11.16.summary
Summary Diagram
Fig. 11.1.
Fig11_1planetary_nebula_hs-2000-12-a-full_tif.jpg
Fig. 11.2.
Fig11_2Formation_of_a_plantary_nebula_and_white_dwarf_star.jpg
Fig. 11.3.
Fig11_3 Eskimo Nebula
Fig. 11.4.
FIg11_4 Cat's Eye Nebula
Fig. 11.5.
Fig11_5 (left)Sirius
Fig. 11.5.
Fig11_5 (right)Sirius_X-ray
Fig. 11.6.
Fig11_6 Hot white dwarf revealed
Fig. 11.7.
Fig11_7 Nova
Fig. 11.8.
Fig11_8 Type II supernova
Fig. 11.9.
Fig11_9 A light echo
Fig. 11.10.
Fig11_10 tycho supernova remnant
Fig. 11.11.
Fig11_11 Cassiopeia A_radio VLA image
Fig. 11.12.
Fig11_12 Cassiopeia A x-ray
Fig. 11.13.
Fig11_13 Crab Nebula
Fig. 11.14.
Fig11_14 Pulsar radio
Fig. 11.15.
Fig11_15 crab xrayopt
Fig. 11.16.
Fig11_16 Pulsar Xray

Copyright 2010, Professor Kenneth R. Lang, Tufts University