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Fall 2017 Courses

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Biology 001 Environment Preservation & Improvement.
(Cross listed as ENV 0091)
Seminar based on current readings from environmental journals that provide insight into environmental science for use by scientists, science media, business leaders, and political decision makers. Topic areas include biodiversity and wildlife, alternative energy, ocean protection, climate shift, urban ecology, sustainable agriculture, GIS and remote imagery. Students must attend the first day of class. This course does not count towards the biology major. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing and Bio 2 or Bio 7 or Bio 10 or Bio 13 or Bio 14.
Dr. Ellmore
Block 6: Tuesday 1:30 - 4:00pm.

Biology 004 Gross Anatomy.
(Cross listed as Occupational Therapy 102)
A systemic approach to human anatomy, including the skeletal, muscular, respiratory, digestive, genital, urinary, and nervous systems. Detailed study of the upper and lower extremities, emphasizing normal function. Laboratory sessions weekly. Prerequisite: Any college biology course.
Call Boston School of Occupational Therapy (617-627-5720) for information about this course.

Biology 007 Environmental Biology.
(Cross listed as Environmental Studies 007)
An examination of major natural and created ecosystems and human influences on them. Biological bases for species distributions, human population size, and conservation. Ecological bases for sound land use and pollution abatement.
Dr. Orians, Dr. Reed
Block C: T-W-F, 9:30 - 10:20AM.

Biology 009 Physiology.
(Cross listed as Occupational Therapy 101)
Normal function of the human body based on fundamental biophysical and biomechanical principles. Systems covered will include cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal, renal, neuroendocrine, muscular, and skeletal. Emphasis will be placed on how these systems contribute to neuromuscular control, muscular strength, and endurance.
Dr. Leavis
Block 6: Tuesday 1:20pm -4:20pm. Call Boston School of Occupational Therapy (627-5720) for information about this course.

Biology 011 Kinesiology.
(Cross listed as Occupational therapy 104)
Introduction to normal human movement. The basic anatomical, physiological, and biomechanical principles that underpin normal movement and function. Includes the assessment of muscle and joint function through manual muscle testing and goniometry. Emphasis on the biomechanics of everyday activities.
J Harney
Block 2: Wednesday 8:30am-11:30am
Call Boston School of Occupational Therapy (627-5720) for information about this course.

Biology 13-01 Cells and Organisms with Lab.
An introductory course primarily for prospective biology majors. General biological principles and widely used methods related to current advances in cell and molecular biology, genetics, immunology, plant and biomedical sciences. This course must be taken with the lab — enroll in one of the laboratories in Biology 13L A-N below. Two lectures and one laboratory each week. Four exams + final. Credit cannot be received for both BIO 13 and ES 11. Recommendations: Advanced high-school chemistry and biology recommended.
Dr. Fuhrman
Block D+: Tues. & Thurs. 10:30 - 11:45am.

Biology 13-02 Cells and Organisms with Lab.
An introductory course primarily for prospective biology majors. General biological principles and widely used methods related to current advances in cell and molecular biology, genetics, immunology, plant and biomedical sciences. This course must be taken with the lab -- enroll in one of the laboratories in Biology 13L A-N below. Two lectures and one laboratory each week. Four exams + final. Credit cannot be received for both BIO 13 and ES 11. Recommendations: Advanced high-school chemistry and biology recommended.
Dr. Fuhrman
Block F+: Tues. & Thurs. 12:00pm - 1:15pm

Biology 13L Laboratory A - N.
Members of the department. This is the laboratory component to Bio. 13L, which meets once every week. Laboratory exercises are designed to reinforce lecture material as well as to present new topics. A good initial exposure to ways of thinking about and working with living organisms. Homework assignments will emphasize scientific writing and data presentation. NOTE: Turnitin.com will be used to monitor originality of assignments.

Sci-Eng Ctr Room 029A: Sci-Eng Ctr Room 029D:
Lab A - M 1:30-4:30 Lab B - M 1:30-4:30
Lab C - T 1:30-4:30 Lab D - T 1:30-4:30
Lab E - W 1:30-4:30 Lab F - W 1:30-4:30
Lab G - Th 1:30-4:30 Lab H - Th 1:30-4:30
Lab I - M 6:00-9:00 Lab J - M 6:00-9:00
Lab K - T 6:00-9:00 Lab L - T 6:00-9:00
Lab M - W 6:00-9:00 Lab N - W 6:00-9:00
Lab O - Th 6:00-9:00 Lab P - Th 6:00-9:00

Optional Recitation: Block Arr: M 4:40-5:30PM

Biology 41 General Genetics.
Concepts of classical and molecular genetics. A knowledge of basic genetics and cell structure as covered in Bio 13 is essential for Bio 41 students. Grading is based on two tests and an exam (the exam will be at the assigned final exam time), on-line quizzes, and participation in the mandatory recitation. Prerequisites: Bio 13.
Dr. K Mirkin
Block - H+ TTh: Tuesday & Thursday 1:30pm-2:45pm. Mandatory Recitation you must sign up for one: Mon 1:30pm-2:20pm, Mon 3:00pm-3:50pm, Mon 4:30pm-5:20pm, Mon 4:30pm-5:20pm

Biology 49-A Experiments in Physiology.
Experimental investigations of several problems in physiology using a wide variety of modern techniques. Classes will concentrate on several biological concepts and emphasize appropriate experimental design, data collection, data analysis and presentation. One laboratory session per week plus one discussion period. Prerequisite is Biology 14 & sophomore standing or equivalent.
Dr. Tytell, Dr. M Kao
Block ARR: Lab - Monday 1:30-5:00PM, Sci-Eng Ctr, Room 027D; Recitation: Block L: Thurs. 4:30-5:25PM.

Biology 49-B Experiments in Physiology.
Experimental investigations of several problems in physiology using a wide variety of modern techniques. Classes will concentrate on several biological concepts and emphasize appropriate experimental design, data collection, data analysis and presentation. One laboratory session per week plus one discussion period. Prerequisite is Biology 14 & sophomore standing or equivalent.
Dr. Tytell, Dr. M Kao
Block ARR: Lab - Tuesday 1:30-5:00PM, Sci-Eng Ctr, Room 027D; Recitation: Block L: Thurs. 4:30-5:25PM.

Biology 51A Experiments in Ecology.
(Cross-listed as ENV 51).
An introduction to field research in different habitats. Emphasis on acquiring skills in taxonomic identification, sampling techniques, hypothesis testing and experimental design, data analysis and interpretation, as well as oral and written communication. Opportunity for student-designed group research projects on ecological questions. One laboratory session per week plus one discussion period. Prerequisites: Biology 14 or equivalent & sophomore standing.
Dr. E Crone, Dr. G Ellmore, Dr. P Starks
Block ARR: Lab - Wednesday 1:30 - 5:00PM, Sci-Eng Ctr, Room 027A; Recitation Block L- Tuesday 4:30-5:20PM.

Biology 51B Experiments in Ecology.
(Cross-listed as ENV 51).
An introduction to field research in different habitats. Emphasis on acquiring skills in taxonomic identification, sampling techniques, hypothesis testing and experimental design, data analysis and interpretation, as well as oral and written communication. Opportunity for student-designed group research projects on ecological questions. One laboratory session per week plus one discussion period. Prerequisites: Biology 14 or equivalent & sophomore standing.
Dr. E Crone, Dr. G Ellmore, Dr. P Starks
Block ARR: Lab - Thursday 1:30 - 5:00PM, Sci-Eng Ctr, Room 027A; Recitation Block L- Tuesday 4:30-5:20PM.

Biology 54 Molecular Genetics Projects Lab.
A discovery-based research experience in the field of molecular genetics, taught at the introductory level. Students will each carry out a related independent research project using modern techniques in genetics and molecular biology to discover gene function, identify proteins that play a role in maintaining genome stability, and develop testable hypotheses. Techniques used will include genetic assays, PCR, gene knockouts, and phenotype analysis. Appropriate for sophomores and juniors with no prior laboratory experience. Prerequisite: Bio 13. Genetics prior to or concurrent with taking the course is suggested but not required.
Dr. Freudenreich
Lab -Block 5 & 7, Mon & Wed 1:30-4:30 PM, Sci-Eng Ctr, Room 027D; Recitation Block H Friday 2:30-3:20; Sci-Eng Ctr, Room 027D

Biology 61 Biology of Aging.
An introduction to the biology of aging. Focus on molecular, cellular, and physiological changes that occur during the aging process in humans and other organisms. Major topics include theories of aging, genetic regulation of longevity in model systems, and therapeutic modulation of the aging process. Prerequisites: Bio13 and Bio14 or their equivalent, or consent.
Dr. McVey
Block D+, Tuesday & Thursday, 10:30am - 11:45am.

Biology 93 Introduction to Research.
At least ten hours per week of guided laboratory research, generally including one hour of consultation or seminar with research supervisor and a paper. Details of individual project to be worked out with the supervisor. Gives students an opportunity to participate in biological research on the Tufts Medford/Somerville and Boston campuses. Does not satisfy laboratory or course requirement for the major in biology. May be counted as credit toward degree only. Students typically initiate independent research in their sophomore or junior years. Pass/fail grading. Recommendations: Permission of research mentor and subsequently course coordinator.
Dr. McLaughlin

Biology 104 Immunology.
Concepts of modern immunology and their importance in biology. Topics include humoral and cellular immune responses, antibody structure and biosynthesis, antigen-antibody interactions, cellular immunology, immunological tolerance, and tumor immunology. Prerequisite: Biology 41 or equivalent. (Group A)
Dr. Bernheim
Block - J+: Tues. & Thurs 3:00-4:15.

Biology 110 Endocrinology.
A comprehensive introduction to the chemical and physiological principles of hormonal integration in vertebrates. Topics include: endocrine regulation of metabolism, growth and development, reproduction, neural functions, mineral and water balance, behavior and nutrition. Prerequisites: Biology 13 and 14 or equivalent. (Group B)
Dr. Romero
Block E+: Mon. & Wed. 10:30-11:45.

Biology 115 General Physiology.
Elements of homeostasis and of respiratory, cardiovascular and renal systems are discussed at various levels, from the molecular to the organ system. Prerequisite: Biology 14 or equivalent.
Dr. Bernheim
Block G+: M & W 1:30-2:45.

Biology 132 Biostatistics.
Learning how to describe and interpret experimental results and observations is a critical skill in many disciplines. In this course, students will learn statistical methods for summarizing and analyzing experimental data. Topics include descriptive statistics, experimental design, probability, parameter estimation, inference, correlation, regression, analysis of variance, and nonparametric methods. Note: This course is aimed at providing data analysis tools for any students conducting or planning independent research projects in Biology. Prerequisites: Biology 13 and 14 and one additional Biology course above Bio 14.
Dr. Lewis
Block D+: Tues. & Th 10:30-11:45.

Biology 142 Population and Community Ecology.
(Cross-listed as Environmental Studies 142)
Introduction to population dynamics (population structure and growth), species interactions (predator-prey, competition, mutualism), and community structure, adaptations to the physical environment, patterns and processes governing the world's biomes. Prerequisites: Biology 13 and 14 or equivalent, or permission of instructor (Group C).
Staff
W - F: E+. W & F 10:30-11:45am.

Biology 172 Biochemistry II.
(Cross-listed as CHEM 172.)
Continuation of Biology 171. One course. Recommendations: BIO 171.
Dr. Pamuk Turner
Block G+. M & W 1:30 - 2:45.

Biology 179 Seminar in Marine Biology.
Exploration of the primary scientific literature in areas selected by mutual consent. Topics may include symbiotic interactions, migration and dispersal, larval ecology, adult feeding and locomotory biology, responses to pollutants, and physiology of deep-sea animals. Strong focus on developing critical reading skills and effective writing through frequent, short assignments. Prerequisite: Junior standing and BIO 164 or permission of instructor.
Dr. Pechenik
Block 6: Tuesday 1:30-4:00pm.

BIO-0181 Tropical Ecology Conserv
(Cross-listed as ENV 181)
This seminar and field trip is designed to provide students with an in depth understanding of tropical ecology and first-hand experience in tropical Central America. Topics to be covered include 1) community ecology, 2) ecosystem ecology, 3) physiological ecology, 4) plant-animal interactions, and 5) conservation biology. In addition to weekly readings, discussions, and writing assignments, students will write a grant proposal and present it to the class. Over winter break we will travel to Costa Rica for an intensive two-week field experience. We will gain hands-on research experience in contrasting habitats and learn about conservation efforts in Costa Rica. A typical 2-day schedule will be a morning orientation hike followed by meetings to design experiments, data collection in the afternoon, an evening lecture or discussion, data collection the next day, and data analysis in the evening. Although the conditions will often be uncomfortable (hot and humid), this is an excellent opportunity to gain first hand research experience in the tropics. The cost of the trip varies each year as it depends on outside grant funding (see application for an updated status of funding). This is a HIGH DEMAND course. Fall 2017 and alternate years. (Group C) Bio 14 or equivalent and permission of instructor. A completed application and supporting materials must be submitted by April 15.
Dr. Orians
Block G+: Mon & Wed 1:30-2:45pm.

Biology 183 Seminar in Darwinian Medicine.
The mechanistic vs. evolutionary causes of diseases and modern medical practice. Focus on the evolutionary causes of disease as a means of sharpening research skills and the understanding and application of Darwinian thought. Evolutionary hypothesis creation and testing in both oral and manuscript form. (Group C.) Prerequisite: BIO 130 or permission of instructor.
Dr. Starks
Block 6: Tuesday 1:30-4:00pm.

Biology 190 DNA: Structure to Function.
DNA is the indispensable molecule of life. Fundamentals of DNA structure and functioning are therefore central to understanding molecular genetics and genomics. In this course, DNA structure and function are examined through lectures and discussions of the original scholarly literature. Originally, DNA was believed to be a uniform right-handed double helix with limited structural flexibility. It has now become clear, however, that its structure is highly versatile, and this versatility is vital for major genetic processes. Topics include DNA secondary and tertiary structures, DNA topology and topoisomerases, mechanisms of protein-DNA recognition and the structure of the chromatin; how the principles of DNA organization are employed in key genetic transactions, including DNA replication, transcription, repair, and recombination. Prerequisites: BIO 41 and junior standing or consent.
Dr. Sergei Mirkin
Block F+: Tues & Thurs 12:00-1:15pm.

Biology 193 Independent Research.
At least fifteen hours per week of laboratory or field investigation, which must include independent design of experiments. Students write a summary of research accomplished and give an oral presentation to members of the department. Recommendations: Sophomore standing or higher, and BIO 93 or BIO 94 or equivalent, and prior permission of research mentor and course coordinator.
Dr. McLaughlin

BIO-0196 Selected Topics: Teaching Bio: Pedagogy & Practice
Exploration of special topics in biology through seminars or guided individual study. Prerequisite: consent. Credit as arranged (usually one-half or one course).
Dr. McLaughlin, Dr.McVey
Block E+: Mon 10:30am-11:45am, Room 4747, 200 Boston Ave.

BIO-0196 Selected Topics: Plant and Animal Interactions
Exploration of special topics in biology through seminars or guided individual study. Prerequisite: consent. Credit as arranged (usually one-half or one course).
Dr. Crone

BIO-0196 Selected Topics: Research in Devel. Plasticity
Exploration of special topics in biology through seminars or guided individual study. Prerequisite: consent. Credit as arranged (usually one-half or one course).
Dr. Levin
Room 4745, 200 Boston Ave

BIO-0196 Selected Topics: Biological Pattern Regulation
Exploration of special topics in biology through seminars or guided individual study. Prerequisite: consent. Credit as arranged (usually one-half or one course).
Dr. Levin
Mon 10-11am, Fri 9-10am, Room 4745, 200 Boston Ave

BIO-0196 Selected Topics: Development and Repair
Exploration of special topics in biology through seminars or guided individual study. Prerequisite: consent. Credit as arranged (usually one-half or one course).
Dr. Mc Laughlin
Mon 2-4pm, Room 4747, 200 Boston Ave

BIO-0196 Selected Topics: R for Biologists
Exploration of special topics in biology through seminars or guided individual study. Prerequisite: consent. Credit as arranged (usually one-half or one course).
Dr. Dopman
Thurs 2:30pm-4:30pm, Room 4745, 200 Boston Ave

Biology 199 Senior Honors Thesis
Intensive laboratory or field investigation, including independent design of experiments, a written thesis, and an oral defense. Application is made during the student's sixth semester. Normally, the applicant should have received at least three grades of A toward satisfying the concentration requirements for the biology major and should have a cumulative GPA of at least 3.30.
Dr. McLaughlin

Biology 253-01 Graduate Student Research Rotation.
A research rotation is an opportunity to explore a new area of Biology, to learn new techniques, and to become acquainted with some of the research ongoing in our department as students conduct intensive laboratory or field investigation, including independent design of experiments ending with a final oral report. Students will normally present their findings the Friday before the start of spring semester. Rotation Duration: Oral reports will be given to a group consisting of other students who have just finished a rotation, the sponsoring research mentors, members' of the students' committees, graduate students, and other interested persons. Dr. McLaughlin.1 graded credit. Prerequisite: consent
Dr. Freudenreich

Biology 260-01 Teaching Biology: Pedagogy and Practice.
This course aims to enhance the professional development of graduate students by preparing them to teach biological sciences in academic venues that range from community colleges to Research I universities. Graduate student participants will be introduced to issues related to teaching in both lab and lecture settings and will apply effective teaching techniques in their own classrooms. Program participants will learn about pedagogy, gain practical teaching experience, and receive mentoring and formal evaluation of their teaching. The course requirements are designed to be flexible enough to be pursued alongside full-time disciplinary studies, yet ensure that participants are rigorously trained in biology-specific pedagogy. 1 graded credit. Prerequisite: consent/BIO13L Teaching Assistants. Must also register for Bio 260-02
Drs. McLaughlin & McVey
Block E+: Monday 10:30-11:45AM. Room 4747, 200 Boston Ave.

Biology 260-02 Teaching Biology: Pedagogy and Practice.
Dr. Kate Mirkin
Block ARR: Friday 11-2pm

Biology 291-01 Graduate Seminar.
Presentation of individual reports on basic topics in molecular, cellular, and developmental biology to a seminar group for discussion and criticism. Credit as arranged.
Dr. Freudenreich

Biology 293-02 Special Topics: Field Ornithology
Guided individual study of an approved topic. Credit as arranged. Please see departmental website for specific details.
Dr. Reed

Biology 293-03 Special Topics: Protein Biochemistry
Guided individual study of an approved topic. Credit as arranged. Please see departmental website for specific details.
Dr. Fuchs

Biology 293-04 SMR IGERT BOOT CAMP.
Guided individual study of an approved topic. Credit as arranged. Please see departmental website for specific details.
Drs. Trimmer, Tytell, Rife, Dorfmann, White, Koomson
Block ARR: Wednesday 12 - 1:15pm.