Tufts University  |  School of Arts and Sciences  |  Find People  | 
   

Events

Colloquium Series

Brain, Behavior, and Cognition Colloquium Series

The Brain, Behavior, and Cognition Colloquium Series is designed to promote cross-disciplinary discourse in the areas of memory, emotion, social cognition, lifespan changes, and Cognition and Cognitive Neuroscience in general. The series is open to all members of the Tufts Community and to all interested visitors from other colleges and universities.

For additional information, contact Ayanna K. Thomas, Department of Psychology.

Cognitive and Brain Science (CBS) Talks

The Cognitive and Brain Science (CBS) Talks at Tufts University are held on Mondays from 3:00-4:00pm in Cohen Auditorium.

For additional information, contact Aniruddh Patel, Department of Psychology.

Cognitive Science Colloquium Series

The Center for Cognitive Studies and the Program in Cognitive and Brain Sciences at Tufts University is sponsoring a series of lectures on the multidisciplinary study of the mind and behavior, drawing on philosophy, psychology, linguistics, and computer science. The series is open to all members of the Tufts Community and to all interested visitors from other colleges and universities.

For additional information, contact Ray Jackendoff, Department of Philosophy.

Diversity Science Colloquium Series

The Social Psychology Area of the Department of Psychology is pleased to announce the Diversity Science Colloquium Series. The purpose of the Diversity Science series is to promote discourse and research at Tufts on the social, cognitive, and behavioral effects of race, gender, culture, and diversity in general. The series is open to all members of the Tufts Community and to all interested visitors.

For additional information, contact Keith Maddox, Department of Psychology.

The G.V.R. Khodadad Lecture Series

Started in 2014, the G.V.R. Khodadad Lecture is a yearly endowed lecture series intended for the Tufts community on the topics of the psychological and biological underpinnings of excessive (pathological) selfishness and aggressive behavior.

For additional information, contact Klaus Mizcek, Department of Psychology.