Graduate Information:

Introduction

Fields of Study

Program for MA in History

Museum Studies & History

Ph.D. Program

Learning Objectives

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Graduate

Learning Objectives


Learning Objectives for MA Program in History

  1. Ability to interpret primary and secondary sources quickly and critically.

  2. Familiarity with printed and electronic aids to historical research, knowledge of
    bibliographical search procedures, and ability effectively to develop bibliography for
    research.

  3. Familiarity with broad outlines of historical interpretation and narrative in fields of
    specialization.

  4. Cognizance of dominant schools of historical explanation and narrative, and ability to apply the various interpretative frameworks to investigation of data.

  5. Disciplined habits of research, with experience at gathering primary and secondary historical data and effectively storing them so as to be readily retrieved.

  6. Construction of historical argument and writing: proficiency at marshalling arguments for interpretation or narrative involving complex data, and skill at writing up results or narrative in clear, persuasive language.

  7. Facility at presenting historical argument orally and describing research and findings to an audience.

  8. Knowledge of one language other than English, sufficient for research into sources in that language, or proficiency at one technical field (e.g. statistical analysis, economic theory) relevant to specialized interests.

  9. Ability to work cooperatively on investigation of an area of historical inquiry and to
    accommodate one's own research to findings of co-researchers.

  10. Elementary ability to lead classroom discussion of historical material and assess historical work, and experience at organizing readings and agenda for analysis into an effective syllabus.

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Learning Objectives for MA Program in History and Museum Studies

  1. Understanding of history museum issues in the 21st century and how these issues compare to the issues of other types of museums.

  2. Familiarity with all aspects of museum operations and how they come together to support audiences and collections.

  3. Ability to interpret primary and secondary sources, including material and visual culture, quickly and critically.

  4. Familiarity with printed and electronic aids to historical research, knowledge of
    bibliographical search procedures, and ability effectively to develop bibliographies for
    research, museum exhibitions and museum programs.

  5. Familiarity with (and knowledge of how to find) museum literature generated by museum professionals, and an understanding of how insider-generated work differs from museum literature produced by outsiders (academics, critics, and the public).

  6. Familiarity with broad outlines of historical interpretation and narrative in fields of specialization, and with public history approaches.

  7. Cognizance of dominant schools of historical explanation and narrative, and ability to apply the various interpretative frameworks to investigation of data.

  8. Disciplined habits of research, with experience at gathering primary and secondary historical data and effectively storing them so as to be readily retrieved.

  9. Construction of historical argument and writing: proficiency at marshalling arguments for interpretation or narrative involving complex data, and skill at writing up results or narrative in clear, persuasive language, suitable for a variety of outcomes and audiences in museum settings.

  10. Facility at presenting historical argument through a variety of means and to a wide range of audiences, including orally in formal and informal settings, visually and physically through exhibitions, educationally through the design of activities in school and public programs, and through new media.

  11. Knowledge of one language other than English, sufficient for research into sources in that language, or proficiency at one technical field (e.g. statistical analysis, economic theory) relevant to specialized interests.

  12. Ability to work cooperatively on investigation and to accommodate one's own research to findings of co-researchers and exhibition/program planning team members.

  13. Elementary ability to lead classroom discussion of historical material and assess historical work, and experience at organizing readings and agenda for analysis into an effective syllabus.

  14. Application of skills and knowledge gained through coursework to the real-world setting of a museum.

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Learning Objectives for PhD Program in Modern South Asian History

  1. Ability to read critically and orally summarize foundational arguments, as well as the related works of specific scholars, in Modern South Asian History and related fields, and to situate oneself critically within the trends of the fields.

  2. Understanding of major methodologies of historical writing, and ability to implement a
    chosen set of methodologies in one's own research.

  3. Ability to formulate a research question that makes a valuable contribution to the field of Modern South Asian history.

  4. Ability to conduct independent research in archives chosen in discussion with the dissertation advisor.

  5. Ability to complete an original dissertation manuscript based on individual research, current
    methodologies, and accepted citation and bibliographic standards.

  6. Ability to participate in learned conferences and present research papers.

  7. Knowledge of two languages other than English, sufficient for research into sources in that language.

  8. Ability to teach effectively from a prescribed syllabus as a teaching assistant.

  9. Ability to evaluate student progress and guide student assignments as a teaching assistant.

  10. Ability to formulate a course plan for semester-length undergraduate course, and prepare a preliminary schedule of readings.

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Learning Objectives for PhD Program in Global History

  1. Ability to read critically and orally summarize foundational arguments, as well as the related works of specific scholars, in Global History and related fields, and to situate oneself critically within the trends of the fields.


  2. Understanding of major methodologies of historical writing, and ability to implement a
    chosen set of methodologies in one's own research.

  3. Ability to formulate a research question that makes a valuable contribution to the field of Global History.

  4. Ability to conduct independent research in archives or research libraries chosen in discussion with the dissertation advisor.

  5. Ability to complete an original dissertation manuscript based on individual research, current methodologies, and accepted citation and bibliographic standards.

  6. Ability to participate in learned conferences and present research papers.

  7. Knowledge of two languages other than English, sufficient for research into sources in that language.

  8. Ability to teach effectively from a prescribed syllabus as a teaching assistant.

  9. Ability to evaluate student progress and guide student assignments as a teaching assistant.

  10. Ability to formulate a course plan for semester-length undergraduate course, and prepare a preliminary schedule of readings.

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