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Courses

Courses for Graduates or Undergraduates

This is a complete listing of department course offerings. Some courses are only open to students enrolled in one of our degree programs. Please see Current Course Offerings for courses available for general enrollment.

ED 101 Introduction to Teaching in Middle and Secondary School
A study of the aims, development, and practice of teaching in middle and high schools. Includes 75 hours of pre-practicum observation and participation in a school setting. Students seeking an initial teacher license are required to take course during the semester prior to supervised student teaching. Prerequisite: For MAT students or consent of instructor. Includes a pre-practicum experience. Gravel and Redmond

ED 102 Supervised Teaching in the Middle and Secondary School
Supervised classroom practice in middle or secondary school teaching with a weekly seminar. This course requires presence at the school for the entire school day for a minimum of twelve consecutive weeks. Two courses. Prerequisite: admission to the initial teacher license program. Redmond

ED 103 Introduction to Teaching in Elementary School
Seminar examining issues that relate to curriculum and teaching in urban elementary schools. Topics focus on constructivist theories of learning and development for children with diverse needs, interests, abilities, and educational and cultural backgrounds. Students in this course concurrently engage in a pre-practicum in local urban elementary schools. Prerequisite: consent. Gravel and Redmond

ED 104 Supervised Teaching in the Elementary School
Seminar examining issues that relate to curriculum and teaching in urban elementary schools. Topics focus on constructivist theories of learning and development for children with diverse needs, interests, abilities , and educational and cultural backgrounds. Students in this course concurrently engage in a pre-practicum in local urban elementary schools. Gravel

ED 110 History and Political Science/Political Philosophy Curricula
Introduction to the differing perspectives influencing the history and political science/political philosophy curricula in middle and secondary education. Examination of the effective use of inquiry-based vs. content-oriented teaching, and exploration of the historical legacy of mainstream and alternative curriculum movements. Students will analyze definitions of multicultural education and ethnic studies as well as the content, tone, and form of the most widely used history and political science/political philosophy teaching materials, while developing their own perspectives on curriculum and ways to adapt these to diverse school settings. Prerequisite: consent. Cohen

ED 111 Development of Knowledge and Reasoning in the Science Curriculum
Through interviews of students and readings from science education research, participants develop multiple perspectives on the development of scientific knowledge and reasoning, consider current teaching practices in K-20 learning environments, and design their own instructional plans. Prerequisite: consent. Gouvea

ED 112 Mathematics Learning Environments
Explores models of learning, reasoning, and understanding in mathematics through readings from education and cognitive science research, teaching practice, and experimental interviews in the context of secondary, post-secondary, middle, and elementary curriculum. Prerequisite: consent. Members of the Department

ED 113 Language Arts Curricula in the Middle and Secondary School
An examination of traditional and innovative curricula in the language arts from a developmental, linguistic perspective. Topics include: language development of children and adolescents at home, in school, and in the larger community; history and structure of the English language and its dialects; current theories, practices, and problems of teaching reading, writing, usage, and vocabulary in middle and secondary schools. Members of the Department

ED 114 Linguistic Approaches to Second Language Acquisition
This course explores models of language acquisition, reasoning and understanding in teaching second languages through readings from linguistics, applied linguistics, cognitive science, and education. Students connect theory with practical experience from the context of elementary, middle, and high school levels. (Cross listed with German GER 114 and Modern Languages ML 114) Stoessel

ED 116, 117 Interdisciplinary Elementary Curriculum I
This two-semester sequence of courses focuses on the curricula of language arts and social studies in the fall semester and on mathematics and science in the spring semester. Emphasis on the intersection between teacher knowledge and children's understanding of content and concepts. Prerequisite: consent. Gravel

ED 119 Development of Knowledge and Reasoning in Engineering
Exploration of topics of engineering and engineering education considering both historical and emerging perspectives. Design of instructional plans and example lessons to teach specific engineering and design concepts to K-12 students. Members of the Department

ED 120 Practice of Teaching: History and Political Science/Political Philosophy
Curriculum, materials, and principles of teaching for middle or secondary school history, political science/political philosophy, and behavioral sciences. Prerequisite: consent. Cohen

ED 121 Practice of Teaching: Science
This course requires concurrent experiences teaching science, in K-12 student teaching, university assistantships, or other instructional settings. Participants present video, transcripts, and student work from their teaching, primarily as data to study regarding their students' thinking: How to recognize, interpret, and respond to students' ideas and reasoning. Prerequisite: consent. Members of the Department

ED 122 Practice of Teaching: Mathematics
This course requires concurrent experiences teaching mathematics, in K-12 student teaching, university assistantships, or other instructional settings. Participants present video, transcripts, and student work from their teaching, primarily as data to study regarding their students' thinking: How to recognize, interpret, and respond to students' ideas and reasoning. Prerequisite: consent. Members of the Department

ED 123 Practice of Teaching: English
Curriculum, materials, and principles of teaching for middle or secondary school English and Language Arts. Prerequisite: consent. Members of the Department

ED 124 Practice of Teaching: Languages
Curriculum, materials, and principles of teaching world languages for elementary, middle, or secondary school. Prerequisite: consent. Members of the Department

ED 125 Practice of Teaching: Latin and Classical Humanities
Curriculum, materials, and principles of teaching Latin and classical humanities for elementary, middle, or secondary school. Prerequisite: consent. Members of the Department

ED 127 Practice of Teaching Elementary STEM
This course requires concurrent experiences teaching STEM in elementary school student teaching settings. Participants present video, transcripts, and student work from their teaching, primarily as data to study regarding their students' thinking: How to recognize, interpret, and respond to students' ideas and reasoning. Prerequisite: consent. Gravel

ED 129 Practice of Teaching Engineering and Design
This course requires concurrent experiences teaching engineering, in K-12 student teaching, university assistantships, or other instructional settings. Participants present video, transcripts, and student work from their teaching, primarily as data to study regarding their students' thinking: How to recognize, interpret, and respond to students' ideas and reasoning. Prerequisite: consent. Members of the Department

ED 130 Human Development and Learning
This course is an introduction to theories of human development and learning, with a particular focus on relevance to education. The course will investigate primarily constructivist and socio-cultural perspectives. Experiences with a fundamental methodology (the clinical interview) are incorporated. The course is much like a seminar, in that students will read and discuss different theories and perspectives; all students are expected to drive their own learning throughout the semester. Members of the Department

ED 140 Behavior Management in the Classroom
Theory, research, and practice of positive classroom climate and working with challenging students.  Students will be introduced to practical and empirically derived classroom-based interventions intended to have beneficial effects on the academic, behavioral, social, or emotional functioning of children and adolescents. An iterative, problem-solving approach to intervention will be emphasized. Members of the Department

ED 142 Education of the Exceptional Child
Starting with a history of special education, this course introduces students to effective responses to the diverse needs of exceptional learners in an inclusive classroom.  Building on a strengths perspective, topics include brain and biological development and supporting students with reading disabilities, executive functioning disorders, autism spectrum disorders, and mood and behavioral disorders in schools. Emphasizing the need for collaboration among school professionals, students participate in a case study and consultation project. Beardsley, Rogers, Seaton

ED 160 Post-colonial Theories
Examines a range of "post-colonial" theories in relation to sites of knowledge production and exchange, considering the colonial, post-colonial, or anti-colonial dimensions of race, Indigeneity, sexuality, and gender. Specific attention paid to the role of empire in contemporary state schooling across contexts. Vaught, Members of the Department

ED 161 Anthropology and Sociology of Schooling
Explores educational institutions and the various external and internal societal forces that shape them. Attention to critical, ethnographic studies of schooling. Emphasis on dynamics of gender, race, class, and sexuality as organizing forces of schooling and society. Vaught

ED 162 Critical Histories of U.S. Education
Considers the history of education within the borders of the United States as a struggle over access and resources, and as assertion of sovereignty or independence. Attention to reproduction of and resistance to hierarchies of class, race, gender, nation, and sexuality. Emphasizes the struggles of groups to gain access to or determine their own schooling in the 19th and 20th centuries. Members of the Department

ED 163 Philosophies
Explores philosophical frameworks and traditions that have informed both U.S. schooling and educational research. Special attention to questions of nation, social and cultural reproduction, publics, and hegemony. Vaught, Members of the Department

ED 164 Education for Peace and Justice
Past and present efforts to use education for building a just and peaceful society. The advocacy of education in democratic societies, emphasizing the works of contemporary critical, antiracist, and feminist theorists. Peace pedagogies, curricula, and programs focused on social justice. Participation in a "mini-internship" focused on peace and social justice issues in an educational program. Donahue-Keegan

ED 165 Educating Women and Girls
Use of feminist theory to explore how women and girls of different race, class, and ethnic identities have struggled to define and claim a meaningful education for themselves both globally and locally. Analysis of educational theories, curriculum, and classroom practices from the perspective of gender. Members of the Department

ED 166 Masculinities & U.S. Schooling
Considers questions of masculine gender production in U.S. schools through queer and feminist theoretical and empirical attention to pedagogy, curriculum, policy, and law. Vaught, Members of the Department

ED 167 Critical Race Theory
Examines foundational writings of CRT in Legal and Educational Studies, considering their application to educational questions including, but not limited to: political economies of schooling; governance; policy; curriculum; and, pedagogy. Junior/Senior and graduate students only. Junior, Senior, Grade, or consent of instructor. Vaught

ED 168 Pedagogies
Examines a range of pedagogical theories, traditions, and models, including: culturally relevant, critical, feminist, queer, and critical race. Explores the connections between and among culture, institutional structure, policy, and pedagogy through an emphasis on praxis. Junior, Senior, Grad, or consent of instructor. Vaught

ED 169 Radical Lesbian Thought
Considers radical lesbian knowledge production during the second half of the twentieth century in the U.S. Specific attention paid to the emergence of educational and activist knowledge movements by tracing early epistolary and news-making endeavors as they gave way to the formation of collective knowledge production across literary, historical, and other disciplinary areas. Includes an in-depth focus on power along tense lines of race, class, and gender. Vaught

ED 170 Critical Educational Policy Studies
Explores a range of U.S. K-12 and interrelated policies through critical theoretical lenses. Considers how policies reflect, reproduce, and resist institutional and socio-cultural systems of powers. Attention paid to relationship between educational policy and materialities of race, gender, sexuality, sovereignty, immigration status, and language.

ED 176 Internship
Guided experience in an approved educational setting with supervision. Each student is expected to work in an approved facility for at least 150 hours. Please contact the department for detailed information.

ED 182 Technological Tools for Thinking and Learning
Explores the design and use of new tools to think with, including "hands on" technological tools (software) and "heads in" theories and values to examine tools suitable for a wide variety of age levels, settings, and topic areas. Prerequisite: consent. Bers

ED 183 Grammar and Writing for Teachers
The teaching and learning of grammar and writing in the context of research, classroom practice, diverse populations, and high-stakes testing. Topics include composition theory, writing in a variety of genres, the implementation of writing programs K-12, teaching grammar in the context of composition and real-life situations, teaching Standard Written English to students of color and bilingual students, and response and evaluation. A thorough review of English grammar is included. Summer only. Members of the Department

ED 184 Geography in the Curriculum
Study of five themes adopted by the National Geographic Alliance: location, place, relationships within place, movement, and regions. Examination of recently developed curriculum materials for teaching these themes. Summer only. Daly

ED 185 Economics in the Social Studies Curriculum
This course will focus on the fundamental economic concepts that middle and high school history and social studies teachers are expected to understand and incorporate into their curriculum. Using examples from history, students will study critical economic concepts, with special attention given to state curriculum frameworks and expectations for educator licensure, as well as social studies curriculum development. An economics text, primary source documents and current articles will be used to analyze concepts and content. At the end of the course, students will be required to create a model curriculum unit using interactive pedagogies that employ the economic concepts they have learned. Summer only. Rono

ED 186 Leadership in Community Service
Introduction to theories and practice of service. Development and integration of community service with academic curricula in schools. Students will analyze existing service programs and design and implement projects with schools, community centers, shelters, hospitals, and other service programs. Members of the Department

ED 187 Teaching Drama & Improv
Review of the theory and practice of using drama in education. Aspects of dramatic expression, including dramatic play, improvisation, and story dramatization, as tools for extending the educational experiences of children and adolescents. Particularly suited for those interested in teaching preschool, elementary, middle, or secondary school. Members of the Department

ED 188 Museums, Education, and Society
Social forces shape museums as venues of cultural identity, civic engagement, and lifelong learning. A paradigm shift from an inward focus on collections and scholarship to outward focus on audiences, education, and community involvement is generating both new opportunities and controversies. Topics include evolution of museums, museum learning theory, audience engagement strategies, illicit trade and repatriation, interpretation battles, and museums as sites of conscience. The course is interdisciplinary in nature addressing science, history, children's and art museums. Robinson

ED 189 The Role of "Story" in Education
An examination of the role of narrative in education, including storytelling, autobiographical narrative, journaling, reflection on learning and on teaching practice, narrative theories, and presentation at conferences and publication. Attention given to "story" as a way of relating to students K-12, as a means for teachers to make meaning of their practice, and for students to make sense of their learning and development. A variety of fiction and non-fiction, theories of narrative, and educational texts that use narrative as a tool of learning and reflection will be read. Writing and sharing of writing will be a component of each class session. Members of the Department

ED 191 The Foundations of Literacy
Exploring the role of literacies, multiliteracies, reading and writing instruction, and responding to students' developing dispositions as literate individuals in schools. Spencer and Parker

ED 191 Any Color You Like
This class examines the topic of color through the lens of humanities and aesthetics to mine the ways visual literacy can inform and interface with a science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) curriculum. Specifically, students in this class will be introduced to some of the socio-economic and cultural history of color as a topic of study as well as its perceptual and aesthetic reception. Carefully chosen studio exercises performed in class and at home complement the academic content. These exercises will develop students' artistic sensitivity, inform their perception of color, and help hone visual sensibilities. The numerous drawing and color mixing, exercises are an integral part of the course as they enable students to explore how visual arts complement teaching and learning STEAM content courses. All planned class activities, field trips, and readings will inform robust weekly discussions in which students will share their experiences developing pedagogic content that can be enriched through visual analysis. Guzman

ED 191 Psychological Perspective with a Focus on Gender and Rural Issues

ED 191 Understanding and Tapping Student Resources for Learning

ED 191 Feminist Theories in Education

ED 192 Special Topics: Queering Education
This course starts from the position that queering means "transgressing." Students will utilize queer of color theories, radical feminists of color critiques, Critical Transnational Feminist theories and others to examine pressing educational inequalities. This course will take a structural approach to understanding, discussing, and theorizing queering. Many perspectives of queerness, queering, and queer take a person-centered approach to the extent that queering, as an act, identity, or political orientation is made to be a normalized part of oppressive systems instead of transgressing and working against those systems. Students will engage in conversation about ways queer theories in tandem with other theoretical frameworks can address these concerns. Department consent. Powell

ED 198, 199 Field Studies in Education
Participation in applied activities or in research or educational projects involving the development of programs and materials in schools and museums, or in other educational settings, such as those associated with clinical settings, media studios, or industry. In addition to the field experience, students are required to attend bi-weekly seminars devoted to the analysis of the theoretical and practical issues related to the fieldwork. Prerequisite: consent. Members of the Department

ED 199-01: Field Experience in Education: Step Up Boston
Mental health is undeniably correlated to student development and learning. It intersects with and affects interpersonal relationships, social-emotional skills, school climate, and ultimately academic and behavioral outcomes for all students. School psychologists play important roles in establishing and maintaining strong mental health initiatives and programs in schools. The course will provide students with a window into the field of school psychology and the range of services the profession is designed to deliver. Students will have the opportunity to discuss topics such as: school-based consultation, social skills, current models for prevention and response to crisis, school safety, education legislation, and the relationship between school diversity and education. Pinto