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Handbook

Table of Contents

The Undergraduate Program Overview

At Tufts, as at many colleges across the country, economics is one of the most popular undergraduate majors. This popularity reflects the appeal of a discipline that applies formal analysis to real social problems.

Economics proceeds by building models of behavior, testing the models against empirical evidence, and modifying or extending them when they fail. The models that survive are used to understand economic events, to make predictions about the future, and to guide economic policy makers. Training in economics provides a solid background for many different career paths - from employment immediately after graduation to postgraduate study. It is particularly appropriate for those with interests in business, finance, law, or public policy.

The Department of Economics is made up of teacher-scholars with Ph.D. degrees from the leading graduate institutions. As reflected in the list of faculty members, the teaching and research interests of the faculty cover a wide variety of subject areas.

The starting point for the study of economics at Tufts is Principles of Economics (Economics 5). This one semester course is offered each semester, has no prerequisites, and is open to all students. Students wishing to use pre-college training in economics to place out of this course should see the section of this Handbook on Advanced Placement and Acceleration Credit. Students wishing to transfer college-level coursework in economics should see the section of this Handbook on Transfer of Credit.

The Department offers undergraduate programs that lead to a Minor in Economics, a Major in Economics, and a Major in Quantitative Economics. The requirements for these programs are outlined below. The Department also offers a program leading to an M.S. in Economics that can often be completed with one additional year of course work. Financial aid in the form of tuition scholarships and teaching assistantships is available to well-prepared M.S. students. Please see the Graduate Program page for more information about the M.S. program.

Undergraduate Concentration Requirements

All majors in economics must complete a basic program that includes mathematics, principles of economics, intermediate microeconomic theory, intermediate macroeconomic theory, and statistics. Two tracks toward a major are offered. Option I, the Major in Economics, is less structured and allows more flexibility in the choice of courses. Option II, the Major in Quantitative Economics, follows a more mathematical approach to the study of economics and provides the background recommended for those contemplating graduate study in economics or the more quantitative areas of business and finance.

Under either major option, it is recommended that students begin taking the principles course and required mathematics courses during their first year, and begin taking the core economic theory courses during their second year. Once the principles and core prerequisites have been met, a wide range of elective courses is available. Restrictions on the choice of electives for each major are summarized below. A minimum grade of C- is required for all mathematics, core, and elective courses used to satisfy major requirements.

NOTE: Economics 5 replaces Principles of Microeconomics (Economics 1) and Principles of Macroeconomics (Economics 2) as of September 1, 2004. Students who have not taken Economics 1 as of this date must take Economics 5. Students who have taken Economics 1 (or placed out of the class) prior to September 1, 2004 may replace Economics 5 with Economics 1 and 2.

Option I: Major in Economics

PREREQUISITE
Principles of Economics (Economics 5) or equivalent. See note above.

MATHEMATICS COURSE
Mathematics 32 (formerly Mathematics 11) or any higher-level mathematics course approved by the department.
Students can waive all or part of this requirement by showing adequate prior preparation as determined by the Departments of Economics or Mathematics (for example, through Advanced Placement tests).

Students may substitute Mathematics 30 and 14 (formerly Mathematics 5 and 6) for Mathematics 32 (formerly Mathematics 11). Students who make this substitution and who complete a second concentration must keep in mind that, for the purposes of determining the number of courses that can overlap between the Economics concentration and the second concentration, the Economics concentration requires ten courses.

CORE COURSES
Intermediate Microeconomic Theory (Economics 11),
Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory (Economics 12 or 18),
Statistics (Economics 13 or 201, or Mathematics 162, or Engineering Science 56 (formerly Civil Engineering 102)), and
Basic Econometrics (Economics 15, or 107, or 202)

All 100-level economics electives have one or more of these courses as prerequisites. The mathematically-oriented student is advised to take Economics 16, 18, and 107 instead of Economics 12, and 15. Courses in other Tufts departments are normally not accepted as substitutes for Economics 13.

ELECTIVE COURSES
Economics majors must successfully complete at least five additional economics courses numbered Economics 20 or above. At least three electives must be courses numbered Economics 100 or above.

Option II: Major in Quantitative Economics

PREREQUISITE
Principles of Economics (Economics 5) or equivalent. See note above.

BASIC MATHEMATICS COURSES
Mathematics 32 (formerly Mathematics 11) and Mathematics 34 (formerly Math 12).
Students can waive all or part of this requirement by showing adequate prior preparation as determined by the Departments of Economics or Mathematics.

CORE COURSES
For majors in the classes of 2007, 2008, and 2009, four core economics courses are required:
Quantitative Intermediate Microeconomic Theory (Economics 16 or 203)
Quantitative Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory (Economics 18 or 205)
Statistics (Economics 13 or 201, or Mathematics 162, or Engineering Science 56 (formerly Civil Engineering 102))
Econometrics (Economics 107 or 202)
One core mathematics course or its equivalent must also be completed:
Mathematics 70 (formerly Mathematics 46) or Mathematics 72 (formerly Mathematics 54)

Beginning with the class of 2010, five core courses are required:
Intermediate Microeconomic Theory (Economics 11)
Quantitative Intermediate Microeconomic Theory (Economics 16 or 203),
Quantitative Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory (Economics 18 or 205),
Statistics (Economics 13 or 201, or Mathematics 162, or Engineering Science 56 (formerly Civil Engineering 102)), and
Econometrics (Economics 107 or 202)
Students must complete Economics 11 before taking either Economics 16 or 203. Students in the classes of 2008 and 2009 who have not completed Economics 16 are strongly encouraged to pursue this option when completing their major.
One core mathematics course is also required: Mathematics 70 (formerly Math 46) or Math 72 (formerly Math 54).

Students should be aware that Mathematics 39 (formerly Mathematics 17) and Mathematics 44 (formerly Mathematics 18) may be substituted for Mathematics 32 (formerly Mathematics 11), Math 34 (formerly Math 12), and Math 42 (formerly Math 13). No course offered as a core course can also be used as an elective course. All 100-level economics electives have one or more of these courses as prerequisites.

ELECTIVE COURSES
Quantitative Economics majors must complete a minimum of four additional economics courses numbered Economics 20 or above. These electives must also satisfy the following conditions:
1) at least three electives must be numbered Economics 100 or higher;
2) at least one of the four elective course credits must be explicitly designated as a "research-paper course," or a senior thesis credit. Research-paper courses are denoted with an asterisk (*) in the Department's Course Offerings
3) at least one elective course must be explicitly designated as a "quantitative elective." Quantitative electives are open only to students who have completed the relevant quantitative prerequisite course (Economics 16, 18, or 107) or its equivalent. Quantitative electives are denoted with a number sign (#) in the Department's Course Offerings.

Majoring in Quantitative Economics After Taking Economics 12 or 15

Students who have taken Economics 12 and wish to be Quantitative Economics majors can fulfill the Core Macroeconomics requirement by:

  1. Taking Economics 18. This will result in the loss of credit for Economics 12.
  2. Signing up for Economics 19 as a 1/2 credit course in Quantitative Macroeconomics and participating as a regular student in Economics 18. The Economics 19 enrollment must be prearranged with the Economics 18 instructor who will be the sponsor and will assign the course grade. The student is responsible for all lectures, homework, and exams given in Economics 18 and must earn a grade of C- or above in order to satisfy the requirement. The 1/2 credit in Economics 19 can not be used for major elective credit but will count as general credit toward graduation.
  3. Taking an extra elective economics course from a list of approved quantitative macroeconomics substitutes. The currently approved list is: Economics 205 and Economics 206.

Students who have taken Economics 15 and wish to be Quantitative Economics majors can fulfill the Core Microeconomics requirement by:

  1. Taking Economics 107. This will result in the loss of credit for Economics 15.
  2. Signing up for Economics 109 as a 1/2 credit course in Econometric Theory and participating as a regular student in Economics 107. The Economics 109 enrollment must be prearranged with the Economics 107 instructor who will be the sponsor and will assign the course grade. The student is responsible for all lectures, homework, and exams given in Economics 107 and must earn a grade of C- or above in order to satisfy the requirement. The 1/2 credit in Economics 109 can not be used for major elective credit but will count as general credit toward graduation.
  3. Taking an extra elective economics course from a list of approved quantitative microeconomics substitutes. The currently approved list is Economics 202.

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Declaring an Economics Major

Declaring an Economics Major requires that you:

  1. Complete a Declaration of Major Form (available in Dowling Hall or click here to download)
  2. Have your previous advisor sign your Declaration of Major Form and give you your advising folder (or a copy) to deliver to the Economics main office,
  3. Meet with an Economics advisor and have your new advisor sign your Declaration of Major Form,
  4. Deliver the original Declaration of Major Form to the Dowling Hall Service Desk.

To choose an Economics Advisor you may:

  1. Contact any of the advisors to see if they have room for more advisees.
  2. Speak to a staff member in the Economics office to request help.
  3. Use the online advisor selection page.

Please keep in mind that not all faculty members are eligible or available to be advisors.

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Undergraduate Minor Programs

Minor in Economics

The Minor in Economics is designed for students who have done substantial work in economics but who do not choose to complete all the requirements for a concentration. The minor has a five-course requirement, made up of one basic course, two core courses, and two elective courses. The basic course provides a foundation for the treatment of theory and method that are used in the core courses, and these core courses are prerequisites for most elective courses. This hierarchy of courses makes it difficult to complete the minor in fewer than three semesters. The courses that satisfy these requirements are outlined below.

Please note that no more than one course can be transferred to meet the minor requirements. Second, all courses used in fulfillment of the minor must be taken for a grade. A grade of C- or better must be obtained in the core and elective courses. Finally, a maximum of two courses used in the fulfillment of a foundation, distribution, or concentration requirement can be used for fulfillment of requirements for a minor.

BASIC COURSE
Principles of Economics (Economics 5) or equivalent. See note above.

CORE COURSES
Intermediate Microeconomic Theory (Economics 11 or 203) and either
Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory (Economics 12 or 18 or 205) or
Statistics (Economics 13 or 201, or Mathematics 162, or Engineering Science 56 (formerly Civil Engineering 102))

ELECTIVE COURSES
Minors must complete two elective courses. One must be numbered Economics 12 or above and one course must be numbered Economics 100 or above. An exception will be made for those students who wish to use both Economics 86 and Economics 87 as electives and for those who wish to use Economics 15 as their upper-level (above Economics 100) elective. Courses used to complete the core courses may not be counted as electives.

Download the Minor in Economics Checklist >

Minor in Finance

The minor in Finance is a six-course interdisciplinary minor that gives students a foundation in the formal economics of financial markets and supplements that foundation with important mathematical and philosophical tools. The courses in the minor introduce the study of intertemporal pricing, theoretical and empirical analysis of decision-making under uncertainty, and both positive and normative issues in settings of asymmetric information.

As described below, the six courses in the minor include three core classes, two electives, and a capstone seminar. Within this structure, Economics 50 may not be double-counted for both a Finance Minor and either an Economics or Quantitative Economics Concentration. Either Economics 159 or Philosophy 197 may be taken in connection with a concurrent internship with the consent of the course instructor and the Finance Minor advisor. At most, one Finance Minor elective may be double-counted as an Economics or Quantitative Economics major elective.

The Minor in Finance requires the completion of six (6) courses as follows:

  1. Three Core Classes:
    1. Economics 50 Introduction to Finance
    2. Mathematics 32 Calculus 1; and
    3. Either Philosophy 24: Introduction to Ethics
      Or Philosophy 38: Rational Choice
       
  2. Electives – any two of the following:
    1. ELS103 Entrepreneurial Finance
    2. Economics 150: Financial Economics
    3. Economics 151: Monetary Economics
    4. Economics 152: Topics in Money & Finance
    5. Economics 154: Uncertainty Methods in Economics and Finance
    6. Economics 155: Quantitative Financial Economics
    7. Economics 169: Quantitative International Finance
       
  3. Capstone Class – One of the following:
    1. Economics 159: Topics in Finance and Entrepreneurship
    2. Philosophy 197: Ethics, Law, and Society
For questions about the Minor in Finance, please contact Professor Christopher Manos, who serves as program advisor.

Download the Minor in Finance Checklist >

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Preparing for Graduate Study in Economics

Students wishing to pursue graduate work in economics should consult with their advisor at their earliest opportunity. Graduate study in economics is highly mathematical. Entrance into top programs, especially the top twenty programs, is also extremely competitive. On the other hand, there is excellent funding available for smart and well trained applicants and Tufts has historically done a good job of placing students in top Ph.D. programs.

Because the top doctoral programs are so competitive, it is important that you plan your undergraduate course of study carefully so that you will both stand out as an applicant and be successful in the program. Doing a senior thesis or some other research activity can be valuable. Econometrics is an invaluable tool and a signal to graduate programs of your ability to do quantitative work in economics. Equally (if not more) important, you should take higher level Mathematics courses.

The Department of Economics recommends that you take at the minimum:
Mathematics 42 (formerly Mathematics 13), or Mathematics 44 (formerly Mathematics 18);
Mathematics 70 (formerly Mathematics 46);
Mathematics 72 (formerly Mathematics 54);
Mathematics 135, and Mathematics 136.
Additional courses you could take include Mathematics 51 (formerly Math 38), 161, and 162. These courses, however, will not substitute for courses in the first list.

In addition to demonstrating strength in mathematics, you should take courses that strengthen your writing skills as well as your analytic reasoning skills. You should also take classes within the department in such a fashion that you will have 2 or 3 full-time faculty members who know you well enough to write letters of recommendation for you.

If you plan to spend part or all of your junior year abroad, we strongly urge you to contact your advisor early in the planning process to find a program that will allow you to maintain the rigor that will be necessary to ensure acceptance at a top graduate program. There are a number of excellent programs that will complement your training in economics here at Tufts and expose you to top-notch teachers and researchers. Other programs, however, are not designed in a way that will allow you to develop the skills and expertise you will need to be a strong applicant in the best graduate programs in Economics. Again, talk to your advisor early in your planning process.

Finally, we note that an undergraduate degree in economics is not a prerequisite for graduate work in economics. Many economists (including faculty in this department) did not major in economics as undergraduates. They did, however, have the Mathematics and writing skills necessary to succeed in graduate programs. Please feel free to contact your advisor or any member of the faculty in Economics if you think you might be interested in graduate work in economics.

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Enrollment in Graduate Courses

Tufts undergraduates with adequate preparation may enroll in graduate courses. If such courses are passed with a minimum grade of B- and are not needed for the completion of baccalaureate requirements, they may be applied toward a Master of Arts in Economics. Tufts students who apply to the M.S. program are subject to the usual admission requirements, but are not required to submit Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores. Please see the Graduate Program page for more information.

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Approved Courses for Majors or Minors in Economics

All students should be aware of the following general restrictions on major and minor courses. Students are expected to check with an economics advisor if they are unclear about the status of a course.

  1. No Pass/Fail courses can be used to satisfy the requirements for a major or minor.
  2. A grade of C- or above is required for all core and elective courses used to satisfy major or minor requirements.
  3. No more than two courses can be transferred to meet major requirements and no more than one course can be transferred to meet the minor requirements.
  4. Only courses that have a primary focus on economics and that make use of economic analysis are eligible to be used as electives for the two majors or the minor in economics. Department of Economics courses numbered Economics 3 through Economics 10 (with the exception of Economics 5) are specifically not eligible for credit toward a major or minor in economics. These courses are non-economics courses that are offered as a service to the student community. This policy specifically excludes several courses that are primarily "business" courses, such as Economics 3 (Accounting), Economics 6 (Business Law), and Economics 7 (Principles of Finance). Business classes that are offered by other Tufts' programs and business classes that are transferred from other institutions are also excluded.
  5. Courses offered by Experimental College may not be used to satisfy major or minor requirements.
  6. Courses offered by other departments in AS&E or in other schools at Tufts (including Fletcher) that have a primary focus on economics and that make use of economic analysis may be eligible, with the approval of the Department's Transfer-of-Credit Representative, to be used as electives. Any such course should have at least an Economics 1, 2, or 5 prerequisite (or their equivalent). Please consult the Transfer of Credit checklist for the steps that must be followed in order to petition to have courses from other departments at Tufts accepted for economics credit.

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Advanced Placements and Acceleration Credit

Any awards of credit for previous secondary school work must conform to the regulations stated in the Bulletin of Tufts University for Arts & Sciences as administered by the Office of the Dean of the Colleges. Questions about the interpretation of these regulations should be directed to the Dean's office. If a student is awarded advanced placement or accelerated credit based on previous work, the student may not take a comparable course for credit toward the degree. The most common award for secondary school work in economics is for credit in Principles of Microeconomics or credit in Principles of Macroeconomics. This credit is typically awarded for satisfactory scores of CEEB Advanced Placement Exams or on other recognized national matriculation exams.

Advanced Placement Examinations of the College Entrance Examination Board

  • A student scoring 5 on the Microeconomics AP exam is eligible for one credit. The student should enroll in Principles of Economics (Economics 5).
  • A student scoring 5 on the Macroeconomics AP exam is eligible for one credit. The student should enroll in Principles of Economics (Economics 5).
  • A student scoring 5 on the Microeconomics AP exam and 5 on the Macroeconomics AP exam is eligible for two credits. The student is eligible for enrollment into intermediate economic theory courses (Economics 11, 12, or 18) and should not enroll in Principles of Economics (Economics 5).
  • Credit from the Statistics AP exam does not satisfy the Statistics (Economics 13) course requirement for any economics major or minor.

Foreign Diploma Credit

  • British General Certificate of Education, A-Level
    A student with a grade of A, B, or C in economics is eligible for one Tufts credit for Principles of Economics, and placement into intermediate economic theory courses.
  • French Baccalaureate
    A student with a score of 10 or higher with a coefficient of 3 or higher in economics is eligible for one Tufts credit for Principles of Economics and placement into intermediate economic theory courses.
  • International Baccalaureate, Higher Level
    A student with a score of 5 or higher is eligible for one Tufts credit for Principles of Economics and placement into intermediate economic theory courses.
  • Foreign diplomat credit for Statistics does not satisfy the Statistics (Economics 13) requirement for any economics major or minor.

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Transfer of Credit

Students seeking Transfer of Credit for courses taken elsewhere must obtain the approval of the Department's Transfer-of-Credit Representative. Please consult the Transfer of Credit Policies and Procedures, which are administered by Student Services.

Transfer of Credit for University Credit
The Department of Economics is responsible for authorizing credit toward the graduation requirement for economics courses taken at other colleges and universities. The Department will not approve the transfer of credit for business, business administration, marketing, or other business-related courses unless these courses have primarily economic content, as determined by the Department's Transfer-of-Credit Representative.

Transfer of Credit for Major and Minor Requirements
Do not take courses elsewhere in anticipation of receiving concentration credit unless you have received prior approval from the Department's Transfer-of-Credit Representative. This advance consultation and approval is crucial because students sometimes do not receive credit for work elsewhere which is not deemed appropriate for Tufts course credit. Information on non-Tufts programs is available from the office of Programs Abroad in Dowling Hall.

Your request for Transfer of Credit should include supporting material, such as a course description, course syllabus, papers written, and tests taken. The Department of Economics will not approve the transfer of credit for business, business administration, marketing, or other business-related courses unless these courses have primarily economic content, as determined by the Department's Transfer-of-Credit Representative.

No more than two economics courses taken elsewhere can normally be used to satisfy the requirements of either economics major. This applies to all Tufts Abroad programs, with the exception of Tufts-in-London and the London School of Economics. The Department will accept three economics courses from these programs. No more than one economics course from any other program can normally be used to satisfy the requirements of the economics minor.

Normally, courses taken elsewhere will not be allowed to satisfy the Intermediate Microeconomic Theory (Economics 11/16), Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory (Economics 12/18), Statistics (Economics 13), and Econometrics (15/107) requirements. In the rare event that extenuating circumstances exist which would lead to a waiver of this rule, the approval must be obtained from your Economics Advisor and the Department's Transfer of Credit Representative before the course is taken.

Year-long courses taken elsewhere will normally receive two credits - one economics credit and one credit towards the general university graduation requirements. Two economics credits will be allowed only if supporting materials including syllabus, exams, and papers indicate that two economics credits are warranted. Prior approval will not be given for more than one credit without a copy of the syllabus or the course outline with readings. The only exceptions to this rule are Tufts Abroad courses that are on the pre-approved list. You can get the list from the Office of Programs Abroad.

If you wish to use any transferred course as an upper-level (100 or above) elective course, you must present evidence that either Intermediate Microeconomic Theory, Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory, or Statistics are prerequisites for the course. Rare exceptions are made for courses without prerequisites if the course content, as indicated by the syllabus, exams, and/or papers is sufficiently advanced.

Tufts-in-London and London School of Economics
The Department will approve up to three economics courses taken at Tufts-in-London or London School of Economics from an approved list.

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Internship Information

No Internship Credit or Sponsorship is available through the Department of Economics.

The Department of Economics does not have an internship program, is not allowed to grant internship credit, and does not sponsor internships. Students who are interested in "business" internships should consult Tufts Career Services.

Internship Types
Internship types include non-credit internships, transcript-notation internships, and for-credit internships. Tufts Career Services provides information and counseling about all of these possibilities. A summary of internship information and Tufts regulations is available through the Tufts Career Services website.

Non-Credit Internships
Some non-credit internships do not require any Tufts sponsorship and can be completed with no official involvement of Tufts.

Occasionally companies will advertise their internships without noting restrictions and only later inform students that some Tufts recognition is required. Some companies that follow this bait-and-switch approach will accept Tufts' transcript notation. Some want special letters from Tufts.

Career Services has developed a letter which some companies, such as Salomon Smith Barney, will accept instead of registration for academic credit. Students with questions about these companies and letters should contact Marie McCool in Career Services.

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Honors in Economics

The award of degrees Magna Cum Laude and Summa Cum Laude requires recommendation by the Department. Recommendation is not automatically determined by any mechanical rules, but the minimum requirements to be considered by the Department are shown below. Students should keep in mind that course credits transferred to Tufts without letter grades are not normally used as part of the review for honors.

Magna Cum Laude
To be recommended by the Department for graduation magna cum laude, it is necessary but not sufficient for a student:

  1. To have a grade point average of 3.65 or higher.
  2. To have six or more A's in the courses counted toward the concentration in Economics (Economics 1, 2, and 5 are not eligible).
  3. To complete at least one Economics elective course explicitly designated by the Department as a "research-paper course." Research-paper courses are denoted with an asterisk (*) in the Department's Course Offerings.
  4. To demonstrate a high level of intellectual force. Included in the ways the department judges this attribute are: quality of contribution in classes; excellent performance in all of the courses offered for the major; quality of projects pursued, especially class and seminar papers; quality of a written thesis and its defense; and the overall rigor and challenge of the student's academic program in the major.

Summa Cum Laude
To be recommended by the Department for graduate summa cum laude, it is necessary but not sufficient for a student to meet the qualifications for magna cum laude but at an even higher level. In particular, a student must:

  1. Have a grade point average of 3.8 or higher.
  2. Have six or more A's in the courses counted toward the concentration in Economics (Economics 1, 2, and 5 are not eligible).
  3. Complete at least one Economics elective course explicitly designated by the Department as a "research-paper course." Research-paper courses are denoted with an asterisk (*) in the Department's Course Offerings.
  4. Demonstrate outstanding intellectual force. Included in the ways the department judges this attribute are: quality of contribution in classes; superior performance in all of the courses offered for the major; quality of projects pursued, especially class and seminar papers; quality of a written thesis and its defense; and the overall rigor and challenge of the student's academic program in the major.

The award of summa cum laude is not solely at the discretion of the Department. It requires the recommendation of the LA&J Committee on Honors, and the approval of the faculty of Liberal Arts and Jackson. The LA&J standard for summa cum laude is "extraordinary achievement in the breadth, as well as the depth, of a student's intellectual development." Historically, the Committee on Honors has relied heavily on a review of the student's entire transcript, the earning of at least one "A" grade in each distribution area, recommendations from the student's major department, and a recommendation from a faculty member outside the student's major department.

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Prize Scholarships and Awards

Each year the Department nominates outstanding majors for the following four awards.

  1. The Charles G. Bluhdorn Prize in Economics is awarded annually to an undergraduate majoring in economics who has demonstrated outstanding scholastic ability. This prize was founded in 1983 by Donald Gaston in memory of Charles G. Bluhdorn.
  2. The Marion Ricker Houston Prize Scholarship in Economics is awarded to junior or senior economics majors who have been responsible citizens of the Tufts community and who, in the opinion of the department's faculty, have made substantial progress in mastery of their chosen field. This prize was established in memory of a faculty wife whose friendship and gracious hospitality enriched the lives of many generations of Tufts and Jackson students.
  3. The Lewis F. Manly Memorial Prize is awarded to an undergraduate of Tufts University who combines a record of academic excellence with superior athletic performance. Preference is given to an economics major where there is a choice among otherwise highly qualified candidates. This prize was established by friends, family, and former students in memory of Lewis F. Manly, a member of the Tufts faculty for 40 years, and chairman of the Department of Economics for 26 of those years. He also served for six years as head coach of basketball and for 15 years as head coach of football, uniquely combining a dedicated career as a teacher and as an athletic coach. His loyalty, devotion, and service to Tufts were of a high order.
  4. The Daniel Ounjian Prize in Economics is given to a junior economics major who, in the judgment of the department's faculty, should be encouraged to pursue graduate studies in economics. Preference is given to those whose contributions to the Tufts community reflect the loyalty and commitment which his students and peers appreciated in Daniel Ounjian. This award was established to honor Daniel Ounjian, who graduated from Tufts in 1957 and received his Ph.D. in Economics from Harvard University in 1966. Returning to teach at Tufts in 1962, he served as a Professor of Economics until his retirement in 1993. During his thirty-one year career at Tufts he served for over a decade as chairman of the Department, and was an important contributor to many University committees and activities. Professor Ounjian will be remembered by his students and colleagues for his good cheer and indomitable spirit, for his ability to inspire students to do their best, for his kindness toward colleagues, for his loyalty to Tufts, and for his significant contributions to the Tufts community.
  5. The Linda Datcher Loury Award in Economics, awarded annually to an undergraduate majoring in Economics and/or to a graduate student pursuing a M.S. in Economics, for the completion of an outstanding thesis. This prize was established in 2012 in memory of Professor Linda Datcher Loury.

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The Tufts Economics Society

The Tufts Economics Society was created by, and is administered by, undergraduate students with interests in business and economics. It serves students by:

  1. Promoting student-faculty interaction outside the classroom setting.
  2. Sponsoring talks by distinguished individuals in business and economics.
  3. Representing student opinion on departmental policies.
  4. Providing career information and networking opportunities.

For more information visit the TES web site.

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The Course Numbering System

Each course in the Department of Economics is assigned a number that reflects the prerequisites of the course and the major or minor requirements it might satisfy.

EC 1-2 and 5 Prerequisite Courses are prerequisites to Core and Elective Courses.
EC 3 and 6-10 Non-major Courses do not satisfy major or minor requirements.
EC 11-19 Core Courses are required theory courses for majors and prerequisite courses for the Upper-level Electives.
EC 20-99 Lower-level Electives have Economics 1, 2, and/or 5 as prerequisites.
EC 100-199 Upper-level Electives have at least one Core Course as a prerequisite. Only approved upper-level electives are eligible for graduate credit.
EC 200-299 Graduate Courses automatically grant graduate credit.

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Advisement Report Approval for Graduating Seniors

The steps to apply for graduation and submit an Advisement Report (formerly known as Degree Sheet) are as follows:
Seniors must:

  1. use iSIS to apply for graduation as of some date (typically February 2015 or May 2015).
  2. use iSIS to generate a printed Advisement Report showing all classes you have taken and the classes you will take in your final semester at Tufts.
  3. complete an Economics Major Checklist or Quantitative Economics Major Checklist and have it reviewed and approved by your economics advisor.
  4. leave your signed major checklist and Advisement Report with the staff in the Economics Administration Office (Braker, Rm. 110). The form will be reviewed by the Undergraduate Chair. The form will then be returned to the staff within 24 hours.
  5. pick up your approved major checklist and Advisement Report from the department office and drop forms off at the Dowling Hall service desk.

February 2015 graduates should complete these steps between now and Friday, October 3, 2014.

May 2015 graduates should complete these steps after they preregister for Spring classes, or between Wednesday, November 5 and the deadline of Friday December 5.

The Undergraduate Chair will not process forms for May 2015 graduates until students have their Advisement Report showing Spring 2015 class registrations.

Professor David Garman will administer approval of the Economics Departmentís Advisement Reports while Professor Ed Kutsoati is on leave during the Fall 2014 semester. Please email Professor Garman at david.garman@tufts.edu if you have any questions.

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Checklists / Forms

Please complete the following forms online, print, secure the necessary signatures, and submit to the Economics Administration office (Braker Hall, Rm. 110).

Economics Major Checklist (For 2010 Graduates & Beyond) PDF
Quantitative Economics Major Checklist (For 2010 Graduates & Beyond) PDF
Declaration of Major Form PDF
Economics Minor Checklist PDF
Finance Minor Checklist PDF
Senior Honors Thesis Form PDF
Independent Study / Thesis Form PDF | PDF

*For various other forms, please refer to the Department of Student Services Registrar's webpage.
 

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