Final Report
Admissions and Enrollments
Meeting Notes

February 1, 1999

The Admissions Office at Tufts University is actively striving to increase the number of students of color to achieve a more diverse population. The Admissions Office's goals include personalizing the admissions process, attracting a diverse pool of candidates, and increasing the number of accepted students who choose to attend Tufts. It is also concerned with raising the visibility of Tufts by fully utilizing the alumni network. Admissions also wants to insure that every candidate has some personal contact with Tufts -- an interview with an Admissions Officer or an alumnus, or a conversation with a student.

The Admissions and Enrollment Diversity Dialogue centered around three major topics: (primarily African-American) recruitment, yield, and Asian-American concerns.

I. Recruitment

Our goal is to personalize the recruitment process in order to attract a diverse pool of candidates and to increase yield. We have to convey the Tufts experience better and extend the reach of the University's alumni network. Tufts currently has one of the most diverse Admissions staffs, where approximately 45% of the staff are persons of color.

QUESTIONS AND RESPONSES

1. How are decisions made about which schools are visited?/Which schools are targeted?

Tufts currently works with a high school pool of approximately 3800 schools of different types. Some schools have an ongoing interest in Tufts and a large number of applicants each year. Some schools have a high percentage of students of color, and Tufts encourages interest among their students in order to broaden our applicant pool. Tufts also continues to add new schools to its school roster. Tufts relies on information from current students, parents of current students, alumni, and other networks, for suggested high schools to visit.

Each Admissions Officer is responsible for a certain region of the country. This allows each Admissions Officer to know his/her area and work more effectively to attract high school students to Tufts. The Admissions strategy is to work with high school counselors and local alumni as well as Tufts students and staff to reach the most students. Admissions Officers visit schools (mostly public) to meet with students, and in addition, co-host evening meetings with local alumni to talk with parents and students whose schools were not visited.

2. How are students targeted?

Tufts recruits students using a variety of methods: (1) Tufts purchases names from The College Board's student search lists that give information about students. Students may choose to participate in the search process by reporting their academic interests and performance. Tufts then writes to students and invites them to visit the campus or a local college fair to learn more about Tufts. (2) Tufts hosts evening information sessions for students and their parents. (3) Tufts works with networks (guidance counselors, alumni, current students) to attract students. Tufts needs to foster our connections with our networks devoted to Tufts. (4) Current Tufts students aid in the admissions process by holding receptions or visiting their former high schools to recruit students. (5) Tufts specifically targets schools that traditionally might not encourage its students to apply to Tufts. For example, the Inquiry program of EPIIC includes urban public high schools in its group of schools that participate in a year-long international relations class that culminates in a conference at Tufts. The Calder Foundation helps Tufts alumni work with students from underserved and underfunded public New York City high schools. Alumni who regularly volunteer in 10-12 disadvantaged high schools build relationships with students, teachers, and parents and encourage students to consider Tufts. (6) Tufts gives information about the culture centers to visiting students. (7) Locally Tufts is working with black pastors and churches and Tufts has a variety of outreach initiatives to contact Boston Public School students.

3. What are high schools Tufts visits in each state?

In selecting what high schools to visit, priority is given to schools from which we have seen consistent interest and schools that have a high proportion of students of color. Also considered would be schools which, based on some research, have the potential to offer one of the two qualities listed above. Both the schools we are developing relationships with and the schools with a high proportion of students of color may require time and effort, but we see these schools as very worthwhile ventures. The high schools Tufts visits are listed in Appendix 1 and Appendix 2.

In addition to high school visits, student/parent meetings are scheduled for major metropolitan areas so that we can reach as many prospective students and families as possible. In some areas, two or more meetings may be held to provide appropriate coverage (e.g., metropolitan New York, Washington, DC, Los Angeles, San Francisco). Appendix 3 lists the cities in which Tufts conducts student/parent meetings. In the past two years, we have planned these evening meetings for our highest volume areas for early to mid September so that we can try to maximize the number of people who attend the events. This strategy has worked in that attendance at these early events has been strong.

Some schools (and cities) are visited every other year -- we attempt to spread our resources as widely as possible and use our TAAP committees as representatives of the university in our place.

II. Increasing the number of accepted students who choose to attend Tufts

The crucial factor for Tufts is the quality of the on-campus recruiting experience for students of color. Tufts sends a mailing, conducts interviews, and works with admissions officers to personalize the admissions process for all students and, in particular, for students of color. The key to increasing matriculation rates is increasing the proportion of students who visit our campus: students who visit Tufts are more likely to enroll.

QUESTIONS AND RESPONSES

1. How does Tufts influence the number of students who enroll?

Tufts has a number of strategies to encourage students to enroll. We use outreach and networks such as the Tufts Alumni Admissions Program (TAAP), which currently has approximately 3000 individuals. The Black Alumni Association is an invaluable part of that network. Students and faculty, as well as the Admissions Office, personally contact students through phone calls or letters. There is an open house in April to which every admitted candidate is invited. This program includes a special part for students of color.

In addition, Admissions has several special initiatives specifically to increase matriculation rates for students of color. Balfour Scholars nominees are invited to Tufts for a program in late March or early April. (The Balfour program is a $1 million endowment to encourage African-American students to attend Tufts by providing tuition grants. Since 1990 it has funded 30 students.) SCOPE (Students of Color Outreach Program) hosts a program in mid-April for students of color and their parents. Students can visit Tufts for the day or spend the night.

Finally, students can visit Tufts at any time for an overnight stay, even if there is no organized event planned. They can meet other students and faculty, participate in social activities, or attend classes. Off campus contacts include an Alumni interview, a phone-a-thon to accepted students, and spring receptions across the country for admitted students.

2. Why is there an increase in the percent of African-American students who are accepted but choose to go elsewhere?/Why do admitted students choose not to attend Tufts?

Traditionally black colleges attract some African-American applicants and, like a portion of all Tufts applicants, some African-American students choose other competitive schools. Tufts applicants frequently go to Brown, Cornell, Dartmouth, Georgetown, or Penn. Perhaps Tufts was not their first choice; perhaps they perceived that an education from a different school met their needs. This is an important issue Tufts must address. Tufts needs to make students aware of the value of a Tufts education in order to increase our applicant pool.

Cost is another perceptual barrier which Tufts must work harder to overcome. Tufts needs to continue to communicate with college counselors and specifically ask them to recommend Tufts more broadly (i.e., increase the pool of students applying to Tufts) and to explain our new financial aid policies.

III. Asian-American concerns

QUESTIONS AND RESPONSES

1. Are Asian-Americans over-represented? Is there a cap for Asian-Americans?

Asian-American students are not over-represented at Tufts and we are not trying to limit the growth of the Asian-American population. Over the last decade, there has been an increase in Asian-American students' interest and enrollment. Clearly Asian-Americans are not under-represented on campus in terms of the general U.S. population. However, certain segments of the Asian-American population, such as Vietnamese and Cambodians, are under-represented. Tufts is sensitive to the fact that the Asian-American community is not monolithic, and we want to continue to explore ways to expand the mix of Asian-American students.

2. Why was there a drop in Asian-American enrollment from 1996 to 1997?

There was a drop in enrollment from 1996 to 1997 (192 students vs. 145); however, more Asian-American students enrolled in 1998 (163). The 1999 Asian-American enrollment is 177. While 145 students is our lowest enrollment in the 1990s, this figure is still significantly higher than the enrollment in the 1980s, which ranged from 60 to 98. While we are concerned with the one year drop, we are very optimistic given the 40% increase in enrollment from 1989 to 1998.

Also, Tufts does compete with elite universities for the same group of students. Inevitably, some of those students choose to attend other institutions.

3. What is the Admissions Office doing to recruit Asian-American students?

The strategies for attracting Asian-American students are very similar to the methods used to recruit African-American students. In addition to the usual interactions with an Admissions officer, Tufts tries to personalize the admissions process by having current students, alumni, or other friends of Tufts contact students. Also, students are encouraged to visit the campus and the cultural centers either during the April open house or for an overnight stay at some other time.

The SCOPE board also provides an opportunity for Asian-American students on campus to participate actively in recruitment efforts.

IV. Miscellaneous

QUESTIONS AND RESPONSES

1. Is Tufts literature available in other languages (e.g., Spanish)?

Brochures in other languages have been developed for international students. Currently there is Tufts information in Chinese, French, German, Japanese, and Spanish. Admissions Officers can make these materials available at college fairs and open houses, and can give them to guidance counselors.

2. There is concern about public vs. private school numbers for African-American students.

From 1995-1998, 48% of Hispanic students, 53% of African-American students, 60% of Asian-American students, and 63% of White/other students attended public schools.

3. What about the Priority One recommendation to rewrite the Admissions bulletin to better articulate the distinction between cultural centers and culture houses?

The Admissions bulletin currently gives descriptions about each of the cultural centers and their activities. The culture houses are listed separately under the section on housing.

4. What about listing the web address in the Admissions bulletin?

Tufts internet address will be listed in the Admissions bulletin for 1999-2000 school year. (That is the bulletin next year's seniors will receive.)

V. Questions/comments not yet addressed but brought up in an earlier December meeting

1. How can Tufts increase communications between students and the Admissions Office?

One idea we will implement is to hold a brainstorming session for current students to make suggestions to Admissions. All students are welcome to join us at a "Brainstorming for Admissions Outreach Strategies" on September 9, 1999. At this meeting, the Admissions Office will provide introductory information, such as demographic information and past recruitment efforts, for perspective. Breakout groups, divided geographically, will explore strategies that will impact the success of the admissions effort in the understanding of the opportunities at Tufts, the recognition of the university, and ways to continue and expand the diversity of the student community -- racially, geographically, internationally, by interest and talent, by ability, and socio-economically. We welcome student participation in the admissions process. If you are interested, please click here.

2. Is there transportation and other help for students of color who want to visit Tufts?

Tufts runs buses from New York City, Philadelphia, and Connecticut to bring students on campus. In addition, the Balfour Scholars program assists students with plane fares.

3. Are we only accepting students who get better offers elsewhere? Should we target students with potential but with fewer credentials?

Tufts shares applicants with some of the best institutions in the country. As a result, Tufts is not always the first choice of all applicants. The key to enrollment is the perception of Tufts as an outstanding educator of tomorrow's global leaders. Therefore our challenge is to help students, parents, and others recognize opportunities at Tufts so that students accept our offer of admission at a higher rate.

Tufts is trying to increase our African-American student population in different ways: we are encouraging more African-American students to apply; we are working to increase the number of campus visits; we are trying to increase the percent of accepted students who choose to enroll.

4. Is the Admissions Office understaffed?

The Admissions Office's staff size is fairly typical. Some universities have larger staffs, some smaller. Given our success in building diverse classes, particularly in the last five years, we believe we are the right size to fulfill our mission.

5. How, specifically, will the Admissions Office expand its networks?

We are continuously identifying alumni interested in participating in TAAP (Tufts Alumni Admissions Program). We are also increasing the number of alumni of color in TAAP. We are encouraging undergraduates to participate in student outreach programs such as SCOPE, the program for Engineering, weekend programs, Tufts Preview, April open house, tour guides, and lunch guides. We hope to involve our recent graduates in recruiting, as well. Current and former students are invited to recommend schools or students to the Admissions Office. Tufts also has networks with high schools and their counselors and community agencies.

Specific networks to attract students of color include the black alumni association, ABC, and the Oliver Program.

6. What are recruitment strategies at other schools?

All schools are attempting to increase the number of students of color, so we do share ideas and work with other schools. We are all trying to find new and innovative ideas to increase interest and enrollment. The main point is that Tufts needs to raise our visibility among students of color. Some ways to do this are by working with the New England Association of Black Student Counselors, meeting with Admissions Officers of color from other universities, and recruiting jointly with other universities.

7. What about a replacement for Earl Granger?

We are actively searching for his replacement via a national search.

8. Is Tufts going to increase funding for recruitment and travel for black candidates?

Yes. We have obtained additional funding to work with students of color to bring them to campus.

9. Tufts should change the recruitment efforts that target private schools.

The majority of high schools that Tufts visits are public schools and the majority of students of color come from public schools. Moreover, students in some private schools come from urban areas and/or disadvantaged circumstances. We are working with these private schools as well as public schools to encourage students of color to apply, though we are not relying only on these schools. Overall, 25% of high school visits specifically reach out to students of color.

10. Does Tufts plan to increase funding for campus activities during organized visits as well as for SCOPE?

Yes.

Table 1: Percent of Tufts Population by Year that is African-American


Year % Year %
1967 1.4 1987 4.1
1969 5.6 1993 3.5
1970 8.2 1995 3.9
1971 9.6 1996 4.2
1972 11* 1997 4.8
1973 11* 1998 5.1
1978 5.9 1999 5.5
1983 4.4 2000 8.2

Data included for all years where information was complete and verifiable.

All figures from Tufts University data except 1972 and 1973

*figures from R.E. MillerÔs history of Tufts University

 

Table 2: Percent of Students of Color at Other Local Institutions - 1999

% of Undergraduate Population

SchoolRank*EnrollmtAfrican
Amer
Asian
Amer
HispanicNative
Amer
White**Internatlcosts

Tufts

25

4,723

5

14

5

0

68

8

30,800

Brandeis

31

2,978

3

9

3

0

80

5

31,100

BC

36

8,921

4

8

5

0

80

3

30,100

BU

***

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

31,000

Harvard

1

6,614

8

18

8

1

59

7

31,100

MIT

4

4,326

6

28

10

1

47

8

30,700

* Rank is the ranking system used by U.S. News & World Report

** I believe this figure includes students who do not list an ethnic background

*** Boston University is listed as a "second tier national university". It falls somewhere after the top 50.

All figures from U.S. News & World Report 1999 College rankings

 

Table 3: Percent Full-time Undergraduate Population at Institutions Comparable to Tufts

(Institutions are the 5 private universities listed directly above and below Tufts in U.S. News & World Report's 1999 ranking of Best National Universities.)

% of Full-Time Undergraduate Population
SchoolRank*EnrollmtAfrican
Amer
Asian
Amer
HispanicNative
Amer
White**Internatlcosts

Tufts

25

4,723

5

14

5

0

68

8

30,800

Washington Univ

16

5,190

6

12

1

0

73

7

29,300

Rice

18

2,686

6

15

10

1

65

3

21,500

Notre Dame

18

7,806

3

4

7

0

84

2

26,600

Georgetown

20

5,916

6

8

6

0

70

9

30,800

Vanderbilt

20

5,786

4

5

3

0

83

4

30,200

Carnegie
Mellon

25

4,784

5

21

5

0

60

8

28,000

U. of
Rochester

29

4,407

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

29,400

Wake
Forest

29

3,877

8

2

1

0

87

2

26,100

Brandeis

31

2,978

3

9

3

0

80

5

31,100

William
& Mary

33

5,444

5

7

3

0

83

1

20,000

Case
Western

34

3.096

6

12

2

0

75

6

23,600

* Rank is the ranking system used by U.S. News & World Report

** I believe this figure includes students who do not list an ethnic background

All figures from U.S. News & World Report 1999 College rankings

 

Table 4: Percent Full-time Undergraduate Population at institutions students frequently choose instead of Tufts

% of Full-Time Undergraduate Population
SchoolRank*EnrollmtAfrican
Amer
Asian
Amer
HispanicNative
Amer
White**Internatlcosts

Tufts

25

4,723

5

14

5

0

68

8

30,800

Brown

10

5,652

6

15

5

0

67

7

31,100

Cornell

6

13,294

4

17

6

1

66

7

30,500

Dartmouth

10

3,932

5

9

4

2

71

8

30,900

George-
town

20

5,916

6

8

6

0

70

9

30,800

U. of
Penn

6

8,990

6

19

4

0

64

7

31,000

 

 

* Rank is the ranking system used by U.S. News & World Report

** I believe this figure includes students who do not list an ethnic background

All figures from U.S. News & World Report 1999 College rankings

 




Admissions, Financial Aid, Development
and Budget Overview
Meeting Notes


February 3, 1999

I. How financial aid is determined

More than half of the 1999 applicants needed financial aid. All aid, with the exception of minimal National Merit Scholarships, is awarded according to the definition of financial need, and all aid is need-based. Tufts uses the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) form, the College Scholarship Service Profile (CSS) form, and tax returns to determine a family's ability to pay for educational costs.

First, Tufts uses a formula to determine the amount of aid needed:

Aid = Annual cost of Tufts education - amount of family contribution

This year the annual cost of Tufts is $32,500. This is the cost of tuition, room and board, books (based on estimates provided by the bookstore), and a minimal but adequate allowance for personal expenses. After calculating the amount needed, Tufts tries to put together a need package that includes self-help (work-study and loans) and gift aid (grants and scholarships).

QUESTIONS AND RESPONSES

1. How does Tufts determine family contribution?

Until the 1992-1993 school year, there was one definition of family need, but Congress made changes in the federal financial aid legislation. As a result, there are now multiple ways to calculate financial need. The government calculates a family's expected contribution through the FAFSA, which determines eligibility for most federal and state aid. Most private colleges continue to use the expected contribution calculation made by the CSS to determine eligibility for institutional aid. This has made financial aid determination more complicated because the two systems consider different aspects of a family's financial picture and so they frequently arrive at two different estimates of financial need. For instance, the federal system does not consider the value of a family's home when calculating need. This increases the number of families eligible for federal funds such as Pell Grants and Stafford Loans. CSS does include a family's home equity. On the other hand, CSS considers unusual family medical expenses and makes an allowances for elementary and secondary school tuition of younger siblings whereas the government does not. Tufts, like most private universities, uses CSS's calculation of financial need.

2. Are there deductions in financial aid if students earn additional scholarships?

Yes. Currently Tufts' system is as follows: the first $1000 of financial aid adjustment is from the loan/work portion of the award. The second $1000 is deducted from any Tufts grant award. Any outside scholarship over $2000 reduces the loan/work and grant parts of financial aid evenly. Starting next year, Tufts will phase in a change to its policy to benefit entering freshmen: any necessary reduction of the award will be entirely from the loan/work portion of the award before any necessary adjustment to grant aid.

3. Can we have a table showing the distribution of aid by family income?

Yes. This information is available in the Tufts factbook published by Institutional Research and is reprinted in Table 1. Remember that average family income has risen in the last five years and that Tufts considers a family's total cost of education so there may be families with relatively high incomes receiving relatively little financial aid because they have two or three children in college.

Table 1: Undergraduate Financial Income and Awards


Family income of aid recipients 1993-1994 1994-1995 1995-1996 1996-1997 1997-1998 1998-1999 1999-2000
below $15,000 4% 5% 5% 3% 2% 4% 4%
$15,000-$29,999 15% 15% 14% 15% 13% 12% 11%
$30,000-$44,999 21% 19% 20% 18% 17% 16% 15%
$45,000-$59,999 16% 18% 17% 16% 17% 16% 15%
$60,000-$74,999 16% 14% 13% 13% 14% 14% 13%
$75,000-$89,999 12% 10% 10% 12% 10% 11% 11%
$90,000-$104,999 7% 9% 9% 9% 10% 10% 10%
$105,000-$119,999 5% 4% 5% 6% 7% 5% 7%
above $120,000 4% 6% 7% 8% 10% 12% 14%

4. What percent of total tuition is covered by financial aid?

In the fiscal year 1999 budget, just under $21 million is budgeted for undergraduate financial aid. In the same fiscal year, undergraduate tuition income is budgeted at $102 million. This calculates to a percentage of 20.2%. As a percentage of total student charges (not just tuition) the percentage is 15.2%.

In the fiscal year 2001 budget, $23.4 million is budgeted for undergraduate financial aid. In the same fiscal year, undergraduate tuition income is budgeted at $112 million. This calculates to a percentage of 20.8%. As a percentage of total student charges (not just tuition) the percentage is 15.6%.

5. What is institutional assessment?

Institutional assessment is a specific expense line item found in the financial statements of all of Tufts schools, including Arts and Sciences. This expense represents a form of tax (10% of specific school revenues) that is applied by the Central Administration to the individual schools. This tax is necessary to cover the costs of the Central Administration which includes departments such as the President's and Provost's offices, Development, Accounting, Accounts Payable, Purchasing, Human Resources, Payroll, etc.

II. Tufts commitment to financial aid

Over the last decade, Tufts has made a serious commitment to increase financial aid. In fact, financial aid spending has increased 263% since 1989 (see table 2).

Table 2: Percent Increase in Tufts spending from 1989 to 1999

% increase

category

69

total student charges

300

library acquisitions

74

instruction

263

financial aid

27

information technology

Despite this effort, Tufts is at a competitive disadvantage in comparison to more wealthy universities. Among other reasons, Tufts has a relatively small endowment, and therefore earns significantly less on its investments than other schools (see Table 3).

In 1993, Tufts began a financial aid campaign called Tufts Tomorrow. Last year $70 million was raised for all purposes. Of that, nearly one third ($22 million) has already gone to financial aid. Another $27 million was given by alumni for immediate use.

Arts and Sciences is also committing significant resources to financial aid. There are funding priorities based on the Higher Education Initiative that will provide approximately $8 million a year over the next five years. Of that, $5 million will go towards financial aid, $1 million will be for faculty compensation and development, $0.5 million will be used to attract and retain a diverse community of faculty and students, and $1.5 million will support new technology for teaching, learning, and research.

III. Fundraising

Tufts goal is to increase donor support for financial aid by stressing to donors the importance of giving to financial aid, providing incentives to donors to support financial aid and appealing to a larger pool of perspective donors. The University is also striving to increase student awareness of the importance of giving back to Tufts. Seniors can accomplish this by contributing to their class gift. This year the senior class gift is going to Career Services.

QUESTIONS AND RESPONSES

1. Why wasn't endowment money earmarked for financial aid?

Donors designate the programs that they wish to support. While the University has been successful in encouraging an increasing number of donors to support financial aid, all donors do not have an interest in supporting financial aid. Additionally, some of the endowment money is unrestricted, which means that the money is not designated for a particular purpose. Tufts, therefore, may apply these unrestricted monies to the programs or causes, including financial aid, that have the most need.

2. Why weren't donations earmarked for financial aid?

Again, donors designate the programs that they wish to support. Many donations have been earmarked for financial aid.

3. How does Tufts entice future alumni to give money to Tufts?

Today's students are the future alumni. Tufts needs to educate its current students regarding the importance of and satisfaction in giving back to Tufts. Some universities start this process at orientation by pointing out how many buildings are the result of alumni gifts or openly discussing the many benefits of gifts to both donors and the students. By following this practice, Tufts will instill in its students the pleasure and pride they will have in giving to Tufts.

Tufts also needs to inform its students that one of the factors used to rank a university is alumni participation in fundraising activities. In fact, the main factor U.S. News and World Reports uses to determine student satisfaction is alumni donations. Tufts's ranking, therefore, is partly shaped by alumni contributions.

4. What about the 70% of alumni who don't give to Tufts?

Luckily, it is not 70% overall, but rather 70% in a given year. One-third of the alumni makes regular donations, another third makes gifts only sporadically and the final third never donates. One challenge Tufts faces is turning occasional donors into regular donors. To address this challenge, Tufts hires search firms to locate lost alumni - people for whom Tufts does not have a current address. This enables Tufts to reach as many alumni as possible. Tufts is also conducting targeted fundraising programs. A recent example of targeted fundraising is the Friends of the Libraries program started in 1996 because almost every student frequents the libraries at Tufts. Tufts also has just started a Patron of the Arts fundraising program because student surveys indicate that almost 75% of the students participate in an art, theatre, dance or music group while at Tufts. Tufts is also beginning a fundraising campaign for financial aid. Hopefully, the financial aid campaign will generate a strong response because a large number of students directly experienced the benefits of financial aid while at Tufts.

5. What are specific plans to make culture centers sites for donations?

Where centers are designated high priorities, targeted fundraising will be used for the cultural centers in the future. Presently, Tufts is working with center directors to develop such a campaign. Tufts will use Hillel as a model as it already successfully raises funds for its programs.

6. What determines what Tufts asks for from donors?

Development "asks" are influenced most by university priorities and donor priorities. Senior officers and Trustees of the University determine the former. Donors determine the latter. When the two can be brought into close conformity, donors tend to give more and to give happily, and the University prospers best.

7. Can we give money to specific causes?

Yes. Tufts will gladly accept contributions designated to any project for which it already spends money, or for any project deemed and institutional priority.

8. How can students help fundraising?

There are numerous events and publications through which the students can express the importance of donating to the University. Students are the most convincing salespeople because they embody the Tufts experience. One way students can participate in fundraising is by increasing their interaction with alumni. For instance, during homecoming and reunion weekend, students should talk to alumni about giving for a specific cause. Any student who would like to be further involved in fundraising should contact the Development Office.

 

 





Table 3: Endowments of Other Universities

University

Endowment

rank

Tufts

441,792,000

84

Universities in the Boston area

Harvard

13,019,736,000

1

MIT

3,678,127,000

8

Boston College

784,500,000

41

Boston University

560,661,000

68

Brandeis

321,001,000

115

Universities with which Tufts competes*

U. of Pennsylvania

3,059,401,000

12

Rice

2,790,627,000

13

Cornell

2,527,871,000

14

Case Western

1,328,800,000

24

Brown

1,111,760,000

28

Wake Forest

747,989,000

48

Carnegie Mellon

653,919,000

54

Georgetown

624,980,000

59

* These are either universities students frequently choose other than Tufts and private universities that were similar to Tufts in U.S. News & World Report's 1999 ranking of best national universities.

All figures from Chronicle of Higher Education, 45 (24) Feb. 19, 1999, pp. A46-A47.







Gary Lowe, Director of Development, sent this memo to the Oversight Panel.
It reports on the Development Office's progress on implementing the Task Force on Race's
Priority One Recommendations.

To: Anne Gardulski
cc: Brian Lee
From: Gary Lowe
Subject: Task Force on Race
Date: Thursday, February 11, 1999





Dear Anne,

Re paragraph 8 of Task Force Priority 1 Recommendations, dated December 22, 1998, please know the following plans on behalf of the University Development Office as well as the Development Office for Arts & Sciences.

  1. University Development will continue to aggressively pursue the $64.7 million goal for financial aid endowment within Tufts Tomorrow, and A&S will continue to aggressively pursue its own goal of $44 million therefor. University Development and A&S Development will seek to achieve $55 million and $25 million, respectively, toward those goals by June 30, 1999. Responsible persons are Brian Lee for University Development and Gary Lowe for A&S Development.

  2. Development encourages the Task Force on Race to engage in dialogue with the deans, senior administrators and trustees if The Task Force wishes to see even stronger consensus around financial aid as "highest priority in fundraising efforts." Development does not decide fundraising priorities, but as always, will do its utmost to advance priorities determined by the deans, senior administration and trustees. They have already deemed financial aid a top priority within Tufts Tomorrow.

  3. Given the lead of A&S in the Winter of 98-99, the University will attempt to mount by June 30, 1999, a multi-million dollar challenge fund to leverage additional gifts for financial aid, including endowed scholarships appropriate for underrepresented groups. Responsible person is Gary Lowe.

  4. A&S in particular by June 30, 1999, will strive to secure at least $375,000 to match the first half of the Leslie and Bruce Male $250,000 challenge to build endowed scholarships for needy students who have arrived at Tufts "against all odds." Responsible person is Gary Lowe.

  5. A&S in the Spring of 1999 will expand its annual President-hosted Scholarship Donor & Recipient event to include donors and recipients from other schools within the university. Responsible persons are Gary Lowe and Brian Lee.

  6. Progress toward 1 through 5 above will be conveyed to the Tufts community by Tufts Communications via its several periodicals and publications, as well as by the quarterly achievement reports of University Development. Responsible person is Gail Bambrick.

gl.




TO: SMTP[tdaily@emerald.tufts.edu]
FROM: Gary Lowe@Fund@DEV
SUBJECT: Ltr. To the Editors re: Financial Aid
DATE: Sunday, February 7, 1999 18:41:41 EST





Dear Jason, Lauren & Jason,

I'm delighted The Daily gave front page treatment to last week's Forum on financial aid. I was surprised to read, however, that some felt I or others disparaged support from Tufts alumni. The support of Tufts alumni, in fact, rivals that of other ranking universities. Alumni support of Tufts has never been stronger.

Ten to fifteen percent participation in giving among YOUNG alumni, however, does leave a lot of room for improvement, especially when the vast majority report high satisfaction in their experience at Tufts. With more than a third of Tufts alumni having graduated in the last 20 years, increasing participation among young alumni is a wonderful opportunity to increase financial aid and diversity at Tufts. It's also a terrific way to secure Tufts place in the rankings of top universities. U.S. News and others view alumni participation in giving as the litmus test of customer satisfaction.

And so, as I invited students last week who want to help to increase financial aid, let's start right here. Working together, we can help others appreciate that twenty percent of the cost of a Tufts education is a gift to every student, a universal scholarship even if they do not receive financial aid. Together, through the senior class gift and other programs, we can help young alumni appreciate that their gifts of every size do make a difference.

In fact, in only a few years, gifts from those who are now students and young alumni will make all the difference, -- for diversity and every other attribute worthy of Tufts.

Gary Lowe
Sr. Dir. Of Development
For Arts & Sciences





Student Life
Meeting Notes




February 8, 1999

I. Resources for Students of Color

Tufts' diversity enhances its educational excellence, since students learn both in and out of the classroom and from one another, as well as from faculty. Yet, this diversity of identity, experience and perspective means that students may at times need support in dealing with issues more common to their group membership.

Tufts provides some of this support through the Cultural Centers -- through funding for the administrative directors of the Centers and the programming they produce. A recent survey revealed that Tufts falls in the top half of a comparative group of ten competitor schools in staffing and funding provided for cultural centers. In fact, only two of the schools in the sample (Brandeis, Brown, Cornell, Duke Georgetown, Harvard, University of Pennsylvania, Princeton, Wellesley, and Wesleyan) provided more staff.

(Information was provided by the schools, and where it is not listed, it is because the school chose not to provide it. Schools are not identified, in accordance with the condition for receiving the information.)


Table 1: Cultural Center Funding
Comparison with Competitor Schools

January 1999

SchoolStudents of
Color %
CentersProgramStaffOther
1African-Am: 8.0
Asian-Am: 17.5
Latino/a: 7.2
Multicultural
Office of
Coeducation
2.75Affirmative
Action
2African-Am: 4.1
Asian-Am: 20.4
Latino/a: 6.3
Multicultural
LGBT
11.0
3Multicultural
International
Women
LGB
30,000
21,000
20,000
2,000
2.5
1.5
1.5
1.0
Affirmative
Action
4African-Am: 2.6
Asian-Am: 9.2
Latino/a: 2.8
Multicultural15,0000.46Office of Equal
Opportunity
5African-Am: 6.3
Asian-Am: 15.6
Latino/a: 5.1
Multicultural
International
Women
none
none
none
6African-American
Multicultural
International
10,0001.0
1.0
Affirmative
Action
7African-Americannone1.0
8African-Am: 6.1
Asian-Am: 8.5
Latino/a: 6.4 African-American
Hispanic
3.5
2.0
9African-Am: 5.3
Asian-Am:17.9
Latino/a: 4.2
Multicultural
LBG
Women
4.5
2.0
2.0
10African-Am: 9.0
Asian-Am: 14.0
Latino/a: 5.0
Multicultural
Women
LGB
International
19,0002.7Equity
TuftsAfrican-Am: 5.1
Asian-Am: 15.2
Latino/a: 5.3
African-American
Asian-American
Hispanic
LGB
Women's
International
26,000
32,000
26,000
15,000
15,000
2.0
1.25
1.25
1.25
1.25
-Office of Equal
Opportunity
-Office of
Diversity
The comparison schools are: Brandeis, Brown, Cornell, Duke, Georgetown, Harvard, University of Pennsylvania, Princeton, Wellesley, Wesleyan.

The figures given were for the various cultural centers.

The universities may have other program funds that are not included here.


II. Policy on Racial Harassment

Students are informed about their options for dealing with racist or discriminatory behavior through the student handbook ("Pachyderm") and the brochure on "Bigotry and Racism". These publications have been revised and the revision approved by students from the Cultural and Ethnic Affairs Committee of the TCU Senate, who originally raised the issue. The "Pachyderm" and the "Bigotry" brochure are distributed to all first year students and are both on the Web.

Administrative Response to Incidents

The Task Force Report does not indicate that students think no action is taken when an incident of racial harassment occurs, only that they feel many students do not know that action has been taken. The Dean of Students Office agrees that immediate action should be taken (and, we think, already does), but what the action should be and what "immediate" is will depend upon the circumstances of the incident. The Office believes that all parties who make a complaint should feel that their safety is of primary importance, that their complaint is being responded to, and that those who are affected understand how the matter will be handled (to the extent that can be known from the outset). The office will discuss current ways of responding to ensure that this goal is reliably achieved.

III. Orientation

Opportunity for Discussion

Diversity issues have been included in Orientation programming since 1984. In response to the Task Force report, the "Many Stories, One Community" panel was lengthened and a program of voluntary discussions was added (in the first year); the next year a pilot program of discussions for a number of assigned advising groups was instituted; for the fall of 1999, that pilot will be extended, with the goal of encompassing all advising groups by 2000 or 2001.

Additional Program on Race

The Diversity Committee continues to look for a suitable program specifically on race or bigotry to be used later in the semester as a follow-up for the panel.

Participation by Student Organizations

In an effort to implement a recommendation by the Task Force to increase the visibility of diverse student groups at Orientation, inclusion of singing groups beyond the 'Bubs, 'Mates, and Jills began last year, and an arrangement which permits six groups (now including Shir Appeal, Essence, and sQ) was worked out with the groups for fall, 1999. Planning is now under way for a Tufts Revue, showcasing a variety of Tufts performers, to take place during the first two or three weeks of fall, 1999.

Role of Culture Centers in Orientation

The Culture Center directors trained peer leaders to work with all advising programs, (except Explorations and Perspectives), better preparing them to work well with all populations. Since one of most important initial impressions of Tufts is created by residential staff (as well as a lasting experience in the residence halls), Culture Center directors have encouraged members of their constituency to apply for positions, thus helping the Office of Residential Life to achieve a diverse staff that fully reflects the diversity of the student body.

IV. Role of the Culture Centers

The Culture Centers are proof that Tufts recognizes that there is not just one "Tufts experience" for everyone, and a student's cultural identity may greatly influence how he or she experiences Tufts. In an environment where students' backgrounds differ, the centers provide transition for those from minority populations and:

a) help facilitate connection to campus resources

b) provide a sense of community in an environment in which members of some groups are few in number and sometimes widely dispersed

c) offer programming to educate the campus about diverse cultural identities

d) focus on issues of importance to their constituencies

e) help Tufts to become more reflective of its diverse membership

The centers are different from one another because they serve different constituencies and those constituencies have different needs. Therefore, there should be no concern for the future of separate and distinct culture centers: there is not and never has been a plan to consolidate the centers. Tufts has always taken a different direction from most of the other schools with whom we compare ourselves and has always felt that the varied needs of different constituencies require the flexibility of different centers.

Staffing and Funding of the Cultural Centers

As of this summer, the current part-time center directors (the Women's Center; the Latino Center; the Lesbian, Gay and Bisexual Center) will be budgeted to be full-time. The directors of the Latino and LGB centers have chosen not to begin full-time status for the summer of 1999 and have the option to hire summer staff to help prepare for the fall of 1999.

The Latino and African American culture center budgets will provide for about $7000 for office expenses, about $6500 for a special Orientation program, and about $12,000 for all other ongoing programming and activities of the director's choosing. Although funds are not allotted on a per capita basis, the Asian American Center will receive some additional funds in recognition of its much larger population. These increases will allow for more varied programming to meet the needs of each center's diverse populations.

NOTE: In response to a question about whether the African American Center budget had suffered a budget cut recently, the Center has experienced no reduction in funds available to it during the past four years.

Table 2: African-American Cultural Center Spending
Meeting Notes



school year* non-salary spending
1995-1996$23,514
1996-1997$27,160
1997-1998$32,931
1998-1999$28,094

(as of December 31, 1998)

*figures are for fiscal year, which runs July-July

V. Spending

There will be no budget cuts to student services: all cultural centers will have a budget increase for next year and staffing and funding for these centers is comparable to the staffing and funding for programs at institutions similar to Tufts.

VI. Harassment Policy

Tufts harassment general policy prohibits all harassment, but specifically mentions that based on "race, religion, ethnic or national origin, gender, sexual orientation, disability, or age" (1999-2000 Pachyderm, p. 52). Violators are subject to disciplinary action, including possible suspension or expulsion. Tufts general policy on harassment articulates its strong stance against all forms of harassment on this campus.

VII. Questions and Responses:

Q. How could Tufts reflect more accurately the diverse ethnic origins of black students, beginning with the admissions process?

A. Current categories are those required by the U.S. Government. Admissions can choose to add subcategories.

Q. Are culture centers committed to meeting the needs of multi- and bi-racial students?

A. Yes, although reaching out to these students can be difficult. Some bi- and multi-racial students identify themselves as "other", making referral to a specific cultural center impossible. Thus, instead of initiating contact, as centers do when students indicate they are part of their constituency, the center must wait for the student to make contact.

Culture centers offer programming for the bi-racial population and members of other sub-groups, once identified, and cosponsor programs with other offices and centers, when appropriate, to serve the needs of students who are members of more than one constituency.





Table 3: Cultural Centers Annual Permitted Spending
Non-Salary Lines
(Everything except Permanent Staff)


Center: 1996-1998 1999-2000 2000-2001
African American 24,000 25,000 25,000
Latino 11,000 25,000 25,000
Asian American 11,000 30,000 25,000





Additional Diversity Funding:
- 2 Cultural Centers increase in salary to Full Time, 12 months
=$7,169

- Pilot Mentoring, 1999-2000
=$3,000/Center (Latino, African-American, Asian, Women's, LGBT)
=$15,000

- Race in American Speaker Series, 1999-2000
=$19,754

- Expension of SCOPE
=$30,000

TOTAL ADDITIONAL EXPENDITURE (1999-2000):
=$71,923





Faculty Hiring and Retention
Faculty Hiring and Retention
Meeting Notes


February 22, 1999

 

I Hiring

Hiring is a complicated process and reflects the collaborative efforts of faculty, deans, and the Affirmative Action Officer. The Administration can not hire someone directly; departments are responsible for hiring faculty but the departments must follow a certain procedure and receive administrative approval. The Administration is involved with the job search process at several stages.

First a department makes a request for a tenure-track position. This request goes to the Administration, who evaluates the request based on factors such as budget and student enrollment. Once a department gets permission to conduct a search, the department must write a plan for attracting a diverse applicant pool. The Administration must approve this plan. Once it is approved, the job is advertised in various publications, and through outreach and networking, to reach a diverse group. The department collects applications over several months and then screens them to form a "short list". These are the individuals who are serious contenders for the job.

The department must submit a Short List Statistics Form that gives demographic information, including race and gender when known, to the Administration. The Administration uses this form to assure that the individuals being seriously considered for the position are reflective of the entire applicant pool. This process helps the departments to be more aware of diversity issues as well as helps the Administration achieve its goal of a racially diverse faculty. After the Administration approves the short list, the department determines which candidates it would like to bring to campus to interview. Once the Administration approves the on-campus interview list, the department extends invitations to those candidates.

The Tufts community -- Vice President, Deans, department chairs, search committees, and individual faculty members -- has been working hard to diversify the faculty and this effort is having an impact. Of course, we can always do more and the University is grateful for the students' initiative in seeking to diversify the faculty further. In the past, the School of Engineering suffered particularly from a lack of individuals of color and women on the faculty. Over the last 5 years they have made much progress. 82% of the new tenure-track faculty and high level administrators are from traditionally under-represented groups. (11 women, 2 Asian-American men, and 1 African-American man). Some of the money that funds faculty searches is used to increase faculty diversity. For example, departments can make "window of opportunity" hires in which the department might offer a job to a prominent person not on the job market but who might be receptive to a Tufts' offer.

QUESTIONS AND RESPONSES

1. When in the hiring process are students involved? How?

Each department makes its own decisions about their search committees. Some departments include students on search committees. In many cases, job candidates meet with students and students formally present their opinions to the department. For example, in some departments, job candidates teach an undergraduate class and students fill out an evaluation. Students can also get involved by attending job talks (the lectures candidates give to the department), giving candidates tours of the University, and participating in informal meetings.

2. Is there a way for students and faculty to voice their needs for faculty hiring?

Yes. Student input is important and they can influence departmental priorities by talking with faculty about their concerns. For example, student pressure helped bring about the interdisciplinary major programs such as multimedia arts and women's studies. Another example is that student demand in the music department prompted Tufts to increase the choral director's position from part-time to full time.

3. Can you say something about Tufts philosophy of hiring tenure track vs non-tenure track faculty?

Tufts is committed to both tenure track and non-tenure track (full-time and part-time) faculty. Most faculty are tenure track. They and Tufts have made a long standing commitment to each other. Tufts does believe that the ratio between tenure track and non-tenure track faculty is important and Tufts resembles other comparable institutions in this balance. Moreover, Tufts realizes that part time lecturers are a valuable part of the faculty. In certain fields, visiting faculty bring experience and benefits to Tufts. Artists who practice their crafts and teach one or two classes a semester are a good example.

4. Does Tufts place job ads in gay publications to increase the pool of gay and lesbian faculty?

Good question. Currently ads tend to be in publications aimed at women and ethnic minorities but the Office of Diversity will expand job notifications to gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgendered publications.

5. Does Tufts consider what courses a person teaches during the hiring process (i.e., how does an individual whose classes would diversify the curriculum fare?)

We will cover curriculum issues more fully on March 15. However, this question does also deal with the hiring process. One piece of information that departments must provide in their requests to hire new faculty is a rationale for the position. So diversity issues are frequently covered in the types of research the department desires from a new faculty member. In many of the liberal arts departments, faculty have some freedom in the courses they offer so there is room for flexibility in adding classes that expand the Tufts curriculum.

6. How many of the new faculty of color are "window of opportunity" hires and how many are hired in the typical job search?

Most of the new faculty were hired through regular job searches -- probably 16 of the 20 faculty of color hired since 1995. The rest were "window of opportunity" hires or hired through a focused recruitment search.

7. Is there a breakdown of the large ethnic categories for faculty (i.e., Asian-American covers such a wide and diverse group of people, are there more specific categories)?

Categorizing people is difficult for two reasons. First, the different databases at Tufts code data in different ways and so ethnic categories are listed differently in different sets of data. Second, all ethnic designations are self-identified so faculty place themselves in the category in which they are most comfortable. For example, there may be people from Spain who identify themselves as Hispanic. Tufts understands that people often identify strongly with specific categories that may not be included (e.g., Vietnamese-American rather than Asian-American). Tufts is also very conscious of the sensitivity of this issue with faculty. It could be very awkward to ask someone "what is your citizenship?" in order to designate either African or African-American for the database.

8. The ratio of Asian-American faculty to Asian-American students is lower than for other groups. Is this a concern?

Yes. Again, there are the difficulties mentioned earlier with self-identification. However, this is something that students can influence by bringing their concerns to individual departments because this is where hiring decisions are made.

9. Does Tufts believe lesbian, gay, bisexual studies are valuable?

Yes. In fact, the Chronicle of Higher Education recently wrote about Tufts because we are hoping to hire two faculty prominent in lesbian, gay, and bisexual studies.

10. Tufts needs not only to hire faculty of color but individuals who want to be involved in students' lives.

While service to the Tufts community is expected of all faculty, the community also needs to support fully junior faculty's efforts to achieve tenure. The balancing of activities with students, teaching, and research is difficult for all faculty, but especially for new members of the community. Awareness of student concerns and issues and active community participation evolve with time. Another complication is that some faculty of color are not involved in research concerning ethnic identification issues and so they may not be interested in participating in culture center activities. However, we realize that it is important for students to have support from faculty of color and so it is important to encourage faculty to become active in the Tufts community. Perhaps one solution is to reward faculty for their participation in student activities.

11. What progress has Tufts made on split appointments? What about progress on hiring faculty committed to diversity?

Tufts has made good progress hiring faculty committed to diversity. The suggestion that Tufts hire faculty with joint appointments in departments and studies programs is problematic. Current by-laws prohibit faculty hiring by programs. Only departments can hire. Split appointments often pull new faculty in different directions and could be detrimental to their goal of tenure.

12. The Task Force on Race recommendations said Tufts would have to make some "hard choices" and perhaps not replace faculty in certain areas. What does this mean?

It's a way to increase diversity. For example, Tufts might not replace a faculty position for someone retiring in an established department (e.g., geology). Instead, that faculty slot could create a new position in the humanities with research in ethnic literature.

13. What is being done to address the potential problem that some faculty or departments will resent the policy of hiring a more diverse faculty?

Tufts has worked with all departments and emphasizes that everyone gets a better education in a diverse environment. Individuals who bring different experiences and viewpoints to a department only strengthen it. Also, many bright students consider the faculty when choosing a college; a diverse faculty helps attract the best students, which further improves each Tufts' department.

The faculty of color who are here help to demonstrate that a diverse faculty is an excellent faculty. This helps reduce doubts and prejudice. Certainly there is potential for problems but Tufts, like the rest of society, is getting better at discussing these difficult issues. We are optimistic that if any problems do arise, we are equipped to deal with them in a way that is fair to everyone.

II. Retention

Hiring is just the first step in developing a strong, diverse faculty. Tufts has to retain newly hired individuals. One way to do that is to make sure that each department considers the question "Is this a person who can earn tenure at Tufts?" during the hiring process. A second, more important method, is to provide support for new faculty so they have the best chance of earning tenure. Tufts has improved this support by adding progress reviews after the second and fourth years. We are currently developing mentorship programs to help new faculty. Some departments have developed special programs to support new faculty as they start their research and to assist them in winning federal grants to fund their research. In addition, some departments also provide opportunities specifically for women and individuals of color to review their tenure progress in meetings with their departments. If a faculty member's tenure prospects are in jeopardy, the department attempts to provide assistance.

Retention is a grave concern for Tufts. New faculty, particularly faculty of color frequently receive offers from other institutions. Tufts has to make sure that our salaries are competitive with other universities. In response, salaries have been increased over the last few years. Tufts also has to move more aggressively to retain faculty. For instance, instead of waiting until a new faculty member has another job offer, Tufts should make a counter-offer as soon as that person enters the job market.

Both Deans and students can help individual departments retain quality faculty. Deans need to continue to work on the tenure process and they need to make sure that faculty of color do not have too many demands on their time in the form of committees and outside responsibilities. Students can help by continuing to share their ideas about making the campus more responsive and welcoming to individuals of color.

QUESTIONS AND RESPONSES

1. Is there a breakdown, by race, of tenure track faculty who leave Tufts in their first few years?

Right now, Tufts is doing well with early retention - we are losing very few people early in the tenure process. Most faculty are making it through both the second and fourth year reviews without a problem.

2. Does Tufts include part-time faculty of color in its mentoring and support programs. If not, why not?

Tufts is improving its support for part-time faculty. For instance, Tufts now provides travel money to part-time faculty so they can attend conferences. However, Tufts needs to continue to increase its support for part-time faculty. Some departments invite non-tenure track faculty to department meetings and all departments should be encouraged to do this. Non-tenure track faculty can participate in support programs as well. One good student suggestion is to increase connections between students and non-tenure track faculty because that will help them feel more a part of Tufts community.

3. What is the Administration's overall strategy for faculty, students, and staff to create community at Tufts and to feel ownership of that community?

Good question. The ideal endproduct of these community discussions is to shape the University's entire philosophy through the exchange of ideas and brainstorming about improvements. These discussions are a group endeavor, something the faculty, students, and administration participate in jointly. We are discovering the areas in which we have made progress and those in which we still need to make improvements. Curriculum development, faculty hiring and retention, admissions and financial aid, and student life have all been addressed. We will use what we have learned from all of you this semester to develop a Tufts community where everyone feels comfortable and welcome.





Curriculum
Curriculum
Meeting Notes


March 15, 1999

I. Procedure for Curriculum Changes

The process for curriculum change is detailed in the handout, "Information on Curriculum Change Processes." In summary, students, faculty, and administration all have a role in introducing new courses to the Tufts curriculum. Students can effect change through the TCU Senate, in particular through membership in the Educational Policy Committee, and through discussions with faculty and departments. For example, a departmental minors program resulted from student initiative. Faculty has a primary role in the curricular process by fostering innovations within and across fields and by voting on committee recommendations about new courses or programs in LA&J and Engineering. The administration's role in shaping curriculum primarily occurs by approving new faculty positions, and by serving as resources on faculty committees.

The deans work collectively and independently with faculty, department chairs, and program directors to effect change and set directions and to determine what courses serve the most students. Importantly, they also are able to reallocate funding to support new curricula, if no new funding is provided from outside sources.

The handout also contains a partial list of courses dealing with issues of race, ethnicity and sexual orientation. Some courses are not listed because they are not taught regularly. The list also includes new faculty and courses that could be considered within the rubric of ethnic studies.

There are two ways ethnicity and race are incorporated into the curriculum. The first question to ask is: are ethnicity and race issues sufficiently covered in the current courses? If not, where are the gaps? Where does it make sense to add courses? Once gaps are identified, for example in Latino and Asian-American studies, serious consideration is given to selective faculty hiring. The case for new positions is considerably strengthened by departmental support. In areas where the demand for courses seems strong, but we lack data about the number of students interested and the potential for course sequences, we can bring a prominent visiting scholar or a part-time lecturer to teach. Continued popularity of a course or courses might then lead in time to a full-time tenure track position. This is "gap analysis," one method of changing the curriculum.

The second method for incorporating ethnicity and race into the curriculum could be termed an "infusion model." While specific courses dealing with issues of diversity are important, it is equally important that all faculty have an opportunity to integrate diversity issues into the existing curriculum, or to modify courses to represent issues of diversity better. The Office of Diversity holds workshops on pedagogy that enable faculty to address the educational needs of a changing and more diverse student body. Moreover, for the fourth consecutive summer, the administration is providing support for faculty workshops on pedagogy where the faculty work together to create new courses. This summer's workshops (1999) will focus on curricular innovation in the areas of diversity and ethics. The outcome is modified courses or new interdisciplinary courses. That is one way the infusion model works to create an overall intellectual climate in which diversity is valued in our community.

II. Questions or Observations and Responses

1. Whose job is it to develop grant proposals for funding diversity curricular development?

Attracting funding for curricular development is an on-going, open, and collective process in which any faculty member can take the initiative. Different faculty and deans work on different proposals. This varies according to the subject area and the funding agency. One of the significant roles of the Development Office is working with individuals writing grant proposals.

2. Why are some courses offered by part-time faculty not included in the course catalogue?

There is no reason why courses offered semi-regularly should not be included in the bulletin and we plan to address this in the next revision of the course bulletin. For example, there are courses that have been taught 5, 6, maybe 8 times that are not listed. It would be useful to have all courses in the catalogue. The TTLGBC website lists courses that deal with sexual orientation issues (http://ase.tufts.edu/lgbrc). Perhaps Tufts could build on this idea and add a comprehensive list of courses dealing with issues of diversity to the Arts & Sciences website.

3. What are funding mechanisms for courses taught by part-time faculty?

All department and program budgets contain money for part-time instruction, and as previously mentioned, deans can provide seed funds. The Higher Education Initiative committee on part-time faculty is exploring the potential of long term contracts for part-time faculty as one way to broaden and stabilize the curriculum.

4. Can we offer courses that deal with diversity without addressing the problems of racism and bigotry in America today? Tufts needs courses that deal with racism and bigotry as well as courses that deal with diversity issues.

This is an important issue, not yet fully resolved. Current initiatives include this summer's workshops and discussions with American Studies about curricular innovation in key areas. It is equally important for students, faculty, and deans to create a positive campus climate that encourages different perspectives and a diversity of viewpoints.

5. What about the Task Force on Race's recommendation for ethnic studies?

The specific recommendation of developing ethnic studies within American Studies will require strong faculty support, addressing the fact that Arts & Sciences currently does not allow split appointments between departments and programs for tenure track faculty. There would need to be a change in Tufts' bylaws for the latter to occur. Alternatively, a larger impact on curriculum could occur by adding faculty in many departments rather than grouping faculty together in an ethnic studies program. American Studies has been in transition and they are re-examining their mission and revising their curriculum. Each year there is an opportunity for faculty requests. We will evaluate those requests as they come to us this spring.

6. The 1993 Task Force on Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Issues recommended a concentration or minor in LGB studies. What has happened with this?

That report was widely presented and many of those initiatives have been addressed. To develop a concentration or minor, faculty need to present a resolution for consideration and then vote on that recommendation. Such a resolution has not yet been brought forward, but this can be done at any time.

7. Why haven't lesbian, gay, bisexual issues been addressed by the administration in these meetings? We have had to raise the issue in questions.

The Vice President's letter to the Arts & Sciences community initiated these dialogues in response to comments and questions specifically focused on race. While this has been the particular focus of our discussions, we do welcome questions on other issues from the community.

8. Isn't the "browning" of America a sufficient reason to educate all our students about diversity?

Yes.

8b. "Ethnic studies" is the wrong term. We need a broader definition. As it is, it leaves out bigotry, diversity that is not based on ethnicity -- such as sexual orientation, and international concerns. Ethnic studies shouldn't be pigeonholed in a national context.

Dean Fawaz noted that "ethnicity" tends to connote different concepts for international students and faculty such as herself than for Americans. Most Americans associate ethnicity with culture and family heritage whereas many individuals from other parts of the world have been exposed to ethnicity in the cross-national context of wars.

9. There are large grants available for curriculum transformation (e.g., Ford Foundation). Why didn't Tufts apply for any of these grants?

When you use the term "curriculum transformation," you are not just addressing issues of identity, culture, race, class, and gender. You are talking about social relations of oppression and domination that include bigotry, but are not only about that. I think we all need collective thinking, leadership and resources, and goal setting for successful curriculum transformation. I expect, too, that the Center for Teaching Excellence could foster curriculum transformation.

Over the years, Tufts has applied for and received several of these grants, one of which was used to develop World Civilizations.

10. Is there a plan to implement the recommendations of the Task Force on Race?

We are making considerable progress. This is a journey we are taking together. For example, one of the recommendations of the Task Force on Race was the creation of an oversight panel that would evaluate our progress. That panel reported to the community on April 22nd, and I hope that you would agree with the panel that significant progress has been made on almost all of the phase one recommendations. Much has been done, though there continue to be different perspectives about some of the recommendations.

11. Why isn't a course on Asians in America and another course on Asian-American literature listed on the handout of courses dealing with issues of diversity? What is the administration doing to make these courses permanent? How can you insure that courses that are needed and are in demand are offered?

The courses on the handout are taken from the bulletin which does not always contain new courses offered by departments and programs.

There are two ways to incorporate courses that students want into the curriculum. First, we hire faculty to teach these courses on a regular basis. Since there are clear gaps in Asian-American and Latino/a courses, we will be more aggressive in terms of curriculum development and faculty. Second, some administrators of color are also faculty and their contracts include teaching courses in these gap areas.

12. How do we validate the experiences of all students and faculty?

Having courses that deal with diversity issues, as well as having a diverse faculty helps empower students and validate their experiences. We need to look at long term plans about developing Latino/a and Asian-American courses. We need to have a plan for a unified set of courses, not just courses in isolation.

The most effective way of changing the curriculum is students' lobbying faculty for courses and faculty's influencing each other to move ahead in building a diverse curriculum.

13. Why is African-American studies not a major? Was it not demanded by students? Was it not acted on by faculty?

While in 1974, the faculty voted to create a major in Afro-American studies, it would appear that this did not move forward. Instead, Afro-American Studies was named as an interdepartmental program where students took courses in different departments. This issue should likely be re-visited.

15a. Tufts needs to look at institutional bigotry and racism. It is being perpetuated by the way in which the administration is viewing the current situation. For example, the administration is considering curriculum and admissions as two separate issues when they should be considered together.

I do not agree. We are committed to increasing diversity on this campus and in the curriculum, and we recognize that more progress needs to be made.

16. How do we fill the gap analysis with faculty? That is, how do we attract visiting scholars?

Many visiting scholars are interested in spending time on the East Coast and using all the resources Boston has to offer. The issue of visiting scholars is being discussed. The Educational Policy Committee just recommended hiring three full time visiting faculty to teach Asian-American studies, Latino studies, and Hindi/Urdu language courses. The initiative for the last of these positions came largely from a petition that hundreds of people signed.

17. Has Tufts determined how much money is going to diversity issues? Has Tufts solicited opinions from faculty and students on how best to use the funds?

The faculty and department chairs recommended hiring two or three faculty each year to increase faculty diversity by setting aside funds from the total allotted to faculty hiring. This is the third year that we have followed this recommendation and we have made progress in hiring faculty of color. New funds earmarked for diversity come from budget reallocations to be enhanced by an additional $.5 million, identified over 4 years, to make long term plans and structural changes such as curriculum reform and faculty hires. This sum does not include significant increases in financial aid targeted toward building a diverse community here at Tufts. We have also added money to the culture center budgets; we are bringing speakers to campus; and we are increasing financial aid. The next step is to develop a more strategic way to assess issues and problems and to use the money wisely to maximize its benefit. We need to make these decisions collectively.

18. Why doesn't the culture option include lesbian, gay, and bisexual studies?

The culture option is for students who choose to stop taking courses in foreign language. The culture option is tied to language and there is no analog in lesbian, gay, and bisexual studies.

19. How can students find out about courses not listed in the course catalogue? How can students find courses on diversity because they are not grouped together in the catalogue?

We intend to make it easier for students to find such material in the future. Each department and program lists courses separately in brochures and on the web, but a collective listing of courses on diversity does not exist. This could be a web project, if students believe that online listings would be most accessible.

20. How can we empower students to ask for more courses?

Students are already empowered and faculty will listen carefully to students' requests for more courses in certain areas.




New Faculty Hires
New Faculty Hires
Who Teach Courses Related to Ethnic Studies


This list includes new tenure-track faculty hired since AY 1995-96 who teach courses that are related to ethnic studies.
NameDepartmentCourses
Ikumi Kaminishi Art & Art History Japanese Art and the West
Steve Nelson Art & Art History "Black" Arts of the United States
Arts of the Afro-Atlantic Diaspora
Imaging Black Popular Culture
Judith Williams Drama & Dance African-American Theatre and Film
Third-World Film: Race and Its Discontents
Barbara Rodriguez English Black World Literature and Film
Tony Morrison
Christina Sharpe English Body, Memory, Representation [focus on black diasporic women]
Narratives of Enslavement
American Women Writers [focus on Latina, Black, and
Asian-American authors]
Tomie Hahn Music Ethnomusicology
Julio Garcia Psychology Advanced Social Psychology [focus on gender, Keith Maddox
ethnicity, and race]
3/11/99





Appendix 1
Appendix 1

Appendix 1: High Schools, by State, Tufts Visits

     

East Anchorage High School

Anchorage

AK

Robert Service HS

Anchorage

AK

West Anchorage High School

Anchorage

AK

Chugiak High School

Eagle River

AK

Hoover High School

Hoover

AL

Indian Springs School

Indian Springs

AL

Mountain Brook High School

Mountain Brook

AL

Vestavia Hill High School

Vestavia Hills

AL

Arkansas School of Math & Science

Hot Springs

AR

Catholic High School

Little Rock

AR

Little Rock Central High School

Little Rock

AR

Pulaski Academy

Little Rock

AR

The Orme School

Mayer

AZ

Central High School

Phoenix

AZ

North High School

Phoenix

AZ

Paradise Valley High School

Phoenix

AZ

Phoenix Country Day School

Phoenix

AZ

Phoenix Union High School

Phoenix

AZ

Scottsdale Arcadia High School

Phoenix

AZ

Shadow Mountain High School

Phoenix

AZ

Thunderbird High School

Phoenix

AZ

Xavier College Prep School

Phoenix

AZ

Chaparal High School

Scottsdale

AZ

Horizon High School

Scottsdale

AZ

Saguaro High School

Scottsdale

AZ

McClintock High School

Tempe

AZ

Catalina Foothills High School

Tucson

AZ

Green Fields Country Day School

Tucson

AZ

Sahuaro High School

Tucson

AZ

Salpointe Catholic High School

Tucson

AZ

St. Gregory College Prep School

Tucson

AZ

Tucson Magnet High School

Tucson

AZ

University High School

Tucson

AZ

Canyon Del Oro

Tuscon

AZ

Albany High School

Albany

CA

Cornilia Connelly School

Anaheim

CA

Arcadia High School

Arcadia

CA

Menlo Atherton High School

Atherton

CA

Berkeley High School

Berkeley

CA

Beverly Hills High School

Beverly Hills

CA

Calabasas High School

Calabasas

CA

Carmel High School

Carmel

CA

California Academy of Math & Sciences

Carson

CA

Chula Vista Senior High School

Chula Vista

CA

Claremont High School

Claremont

CA

Webb School

Claremont

CA

Coronado High School

Coronado

CA

Dana Hills High School

Dana Point

CA

Monte Vista High School

Danville

CA

San Ramon Valley High School

Danville

CA

The Athenian School

Danville

CA

Davis High School

Davis

CA

San Dieguito High School Academy

Encinitas

CA

Torrey Pines High School

Encinitas

CA

Sunny Hills High School

Fullerton

CA

Huntington Beach High School

Huntington Beach

CA

Woodbridge High School

Irvine

CA

Marin Catholic High School

Kentfield

CA

Flintridge Prep School

La Canada

CA

La Canada High School

La Canada

CA

Bishop's School

La Jolla

CA

La Jolla Country Day School

La Jolla

CA

La Jolla High School

La Jolla

CA

Grossmont High School

La Mesa

CA

Helix High School

La Mesa

CA

Laguna Beach High School

Laguna Beach

CA

Long Beach Polytechnic High School

Long Beach

CA

Los Alamitos High School

Los Alamitos

CA

Los Altos High School

Los Altos

CA

Alexander Hamilton High School

Los Angeles

CA

Brentwood School

Los Angeles

CA

Crenshaw High School

Los Angeles

CA

Los Angeles Ctr for Enriched Studies

Los Angeles

CA

Loyola High School

Los Angeles

CA

Marlborough School

Los Angeles

CA

Capistrano Valley High School

Mission Viejo

CA

Santa Catalina School

Monterey

CA

The York School

Monterey

CA

Corona Del Mar High School

Newport Beach

CA

Newport Harbor High School

Newport Beach

CA

Campbell Hall

North Hollywood

CA

Harvard-Westlake High School

North Hollywood

CA

Oakwood School

North Hollywood

CA

Bishop O'Dowd High School

Oakland

CA

The College Preparatory School

Oakland

CA

The Head Royce School

Oakland

CA

Thacher School

Ojai

CA

Castilleja School

Palo Alto

CA

Henry Gunn SR High School

Palo Alto

CA

Palo Alto High School

Palo Alto

CA

Chadwick School

Palos Verdes Pennisula

CA

Mayfield Senior School

Pasadena

CA

Polytechnic School

Pasadena

CA

Westridge School for Girls

Pasadena

CA

The Robert Louis Stevenson

Pebble Beach

CA

Piedmont High School

Piedmont

CA

Pomona High School

Pomona

CA

Santa Margarita Catholic High School

Rancho Santa Margarita

CA

Palos Verdes Peninsula High School

Rolling Hills Estates

CA

The Branson School

Ross

CA

Rio Americano High School

Sacramento

CA

Francis W. Parker School

San Diego

CA

Patrick Henry High School

San Diego

CA

Point Loma High School

San Diego

CA

San Diego High School

San Diego

CA

French American Int'l School

San Francisco

CA

Lick Wilmerding

San Francisco

CA

Lowell High School

San Francisco

CA

San Francisco University High School

San Francisco

CA

St. Ignatius College Prep

San Francisco

CA

St. Margarets Episcopal School

San Juan Capistrano

CA

San Marino High School

San Marino

CA

Marin Academy

San Rafael

CA

Mater Dei High School

Santa Ana

CA

Laguna Blanca School

Santa Barbara

CA

Santa Barbara High School

Santa Barbara

CA

Crossroads School

Santa Monica

CA

Santa Monica High School

Santa Monica

CA

The Buckley School

Sherman Oaks

CA

South Pasadena High School

South Pasadena

CA

Torrance High School

Torrance

CA

West High School

Torrance

CA

Tustin High School

Tustin

CA

Las Lomas High School

Walnut Creek

CA

Northgate High School

Walnut Creek

CA

Westlake High School

Westlake Village

CA

El Camino Real High School

Woodland Hills

CA

William Howard Taft High School

Woodland Hills

CA

Boulder High School

Boulder

CO

Fairview High School

Boulder

CO

Cheyenne Mountain High School

Colorado Springs

CO

Fountain Valley High School

Colorado Springs

CO

The Colorado Spring School

Colorado Springs

CO

William J. Palmer High School

Colorado Springs

CO

East High School

Denver

CO

George Washington High School

Denver

CO

Manual High School

Denver

CO

Thomas Jefferson High School

Denver

CO

Cherry Creek High School

Englewood

CO

Kent Denver School

Englewood

CO

Alexander Dawson School

Lafayette

CO

Centaurus High School

Lafayette

CO

Arapahoe High School

Littleton

CO

Columbine High School

Littleton

CO

Littleton High School

Littleton

CO

Vail Mountain School

Vail

CO

Bloomfield High School

Bloomfield

CT

Branford High School

Branford

CT

Central Magnet High School

Bridgeport

CT

Bristol Eastern High School

Bristol

CT

Brookfield High School

Brookfield

CT

The Morgan School

Clinton

CT

Danbury High School

Danbury

CT

Rocky Hill High School

East Greenwich

CT

Fairfield College Prep School

Fairfield

CT

Fairfield High School

Fairfield

CT

Miss Porter's School

Farmington

CT

Green Farms Academy

Green Farms

CT

Brunswick School

Greenwich

CT

Robert E. Fitch Senior High School

Groton

CT

Guilford High School

Guilford

CT

Hamden High School

Hamden

CT

Hartford Public High School

Hartford

CT

Thomas Weaver High School

Hartford

CT

Watkinson High School

Hartford

CT

Kent School

Kent

CT

Hotchkiss School

Lakeville

CT

Ledyard High School

Ledyard

CT

Daniel Hand High School

Madison

CT

Manchester High School

Manchester

CT

Orville Platt High School

Meridan

CT

Jonathan Law High School

Milford

CT

Joseph A. Foran High School

Milford

CT

St. Lukes School

New Canaan

CT

New Fairfield High School

New Fairfield

CT

Hopkins School

New Haven

CT

The Williams School

New London

CT

Canterbury School

New Milford

CT

North Haven High School

North Haven

CT

Lyme-Old Lyme High School

Old Lyme

CT

Pomfret School

Pomfret

CT

Rockville High School

Rockville

CT

Salisbury School

Salisbury

CT

Pomperaug High School

Southbury

CT

King & Low-Heywood Thomas School

Stamford

CT

Stamford High School

Stamford

CT

Westhill High School

Stamford

CT

Suffield Academy

Suffield

CT

Torrington High School

Torrington

CT

Trumbull High School

Trumbull

CT

St. Bernard High School

Uncasville

CT

Choate Rosemary Hall

Wallingford

CT

Holy Cross High School

Waterbury

CT

The Taft School

Watertown

CT

Hall High School

West Hartford

CT

Kingswood-Oxford High School

West Hartford

CT

Windsor High School

Windsor

CT

Northwest Regional High School

Winsted

CT

Amity Regional High School

Woodbridge

CT

Archbishop Carroll High School

Washington

DC

Benjamin Banneker Academic High School

Washington

DC

Eastern High School

Washington

DC

Edmund Burke School

Washington

DC

Georgetown Day School

Washington

DC

Georgetown Visitation Prep School

Washington

DC

Gonzaga High School

Washington

DC

National Cathedral School

Washington

DC

Saint Anselms Abbey School

Washington

DC

St. Alban's School

Washington

DC

St. Johns' College

Washington

DC

The Field School

Washington

DC

The Maret School

Washington

DC

The Sidwell Friends School

Washington

DC

Washington Int'l School

Washington

DC

Woodrow Wilson High School

Washington

DC

Archmere Academy

Claymont

DE

A. I. Dupont High School

Greenville

DE

Brandywine High School

Wilmington

DE

Concord High School

Wilmington

DE

Mount Pleasant High School

Wilmington

DE

Salesianum School

Wilmington

DE

The Tatnall School

Wilmington

DE

Tower Hill School

Wilmington

DE

Wilmington Friends School

Wilmington

DE

Spanish River Community High School

Boca Raton

FL

St. Andrew's School

Boca Raton

FL

Coral Gables Senior High School

Coral Gables

FL

Coral Springs High School

Coral Springs

FL

J. P. Taravella High School

Coral Springs

FL

Nova High School

Davie

FL

University School of Nova

Davie

FL

Atlantic Community High School

Delray Beach

FL

Pine Crest School

Fort Lauderdale

FL

Hollywood Hills High School

Hollywood

FL

Belen Jesuit Preparatory School

Miami

FL

Carrollton Sacred Heart

Miami

FL

Gulliver Preparatory School

Miami

FL

Miami Country Day School

Miami

FL

Miami Killian High School

Miami

FL

Miami Palmetto High School

Miami

FL

North Miami Beach Senior High School

North Miami Beach

FL

The Benjamin School

North Palm Beach

FL

Bishop Moore High School

Orlando

FL

Pine View School

Osprey

FL

South Plantation High School

Plantation

FL

Suncoast High Community School

Riviera Beach

FL

Cardinal Mooney High School

Sarasota

FL

Riverview High School

Sarasota

FL

Sarasota High School

Sarasota

FL

Shorecrest Preparatory School

St. Petersburgh

FL

St. Petersburgh High School

St. Petersburgh

FL

Berkeley Preparatory School

Tampa

FL

Tampa Preparatory School-Univ of Tampa

Tampa

FL

A. W. Dreyfoos School of the Arts

West Palm Beach

FL

Cardinal Newman

West Palm Beach

FL

Trinity Preparatory School of Florida

Winter Park

FL

Winter Park High School

Winter Park

FL

Atlanta International School

Atlanta

GA

Benjamin E. Mays High School

Atlanta

GA

Lovett School

Atlanta

GA

Marist School

Atlanta

GA

North Atlanta High School

Atlanta

GA

North Springs High School

Atlanta

GA

Pace Academy

Atlanta

GA

Riverwood High School

Atlanta

GA

The Westminister School

Atlanta

GA

Westminster School High School

Atlanta

GA

Woodward Academy

Atlanta

GA

Yeshiva High School of Atlanta

Atlanta

GA

Alan C. Pope High School

Marietta

GA

George Walton Comp. High School

Marietta

GA

Joseph T. Walker School

Marietta

GA

Marietta High School

Marietta

GA

Iolani School

Honolulu

HI

Kamehameha Secondary School

Honolulu

HI

Hawaii Preparatory Academy

Kamuela

HI

Ames High School

Ames

IA

Bettendorf High School

Bettendorf

IA

John F. Kennedy High School

Cedar Rapids

IA

Central Academy

Des Moines

IA

Theodore Roosevelt High School

Des Moines

IA

City High School

Iowa City

IA

Dowling High School

West Des Moines

IA

Bishop Kelley High School

Boise

ID

Boise Senior High School

Boise

ID

Borah High School

Boise

ID

Captial Senior High School

Boise

ID

Meridian High School

Meridian

ID

Francis W. Parker School

Chicago

IL

Hales Franciscan High School

Chicago

IL

Kenwood Academy

Chicago

IL

Lane Technical High School

Chicago

IL

Lincoln Park High School

Chicago

IL

Morgan Park Academy

Chicago

IL

Morgan Park High School

Chicago

IL

St Ignatius College Prep

Chicago

IL

The Latin School of Chicago

Chicago

IL

University of Chicago Lab High School

Chicago

IL

Whitney Young Magnet High School

Chicago

IL

Hillcrest High School

Country Club Hills

IL

Evanston Township High School

Evanston

IL

Homewood Flossmoor High School

Flossmoor

IL

Glenbrook South High School

Glenview

IL

Highland Park High School

Highland Park

IL

Lake Forest Academy

Lake Forest

IL

Lake Forest High School

Lake Forest

IL

Adlai Stevenson High School

Lincolnshire

IL

Glenbrook North High School

Northbrook

IL

Rich Central High School

Olympia Fields

IL

Rich East High School

Park Forest

IL

Rich South High School

Richton Park

IL

New Trier High School

Winnetka

IL

Canadian Academy

Kobe

JA

Sumner Academy of Arts

Kansas City

KS

Olathe North High School

Olathe

KS

Blue Valley North High School

Overland Park

KS

Blue Valley Northwest High School

Overland Park

KS

Shawnee Mission East High School

Prairie Village

KS

Bishop Miege High School

Shawnee Mission

KS

Shawnee Mission South High School

Shawnee Mission

KS

Lafayette Senior High School

Lexington

KY

Lexington Catholic High School

Lexington

KY

Paul Laurence Dunbar High School

Lexington

KY

Tates Creek High School

Lexington

KY

duPont Manual Magnet High School

Louisville

KY

Louisville Collegiate School

Louisville

KY

Sacred Heart Academy

Louisville

KY

St. Xavier High School

Louisville

KY

Baton Rouge High School

Baton Rouge

LA

McKinley Senior High School

Baton Rouge

LA

Scotlandville Magnet High School

Baton Rouge

LA

University High School

Baton Rouge

LA

St. Martin's Episcopal School

Metaire

LA

Benjamin Franklin High School

New Orleans

LA

McMain Magnet Secondary School

New Orleans

LA

Acton-Boxborough Regional High School

Acton

MA

Amherst Regional High School

Amherst

MA

Amherst-Pelham Regional High School

Amherst

MA

Andover High School

Andover

MA

Belmont Hill School

Belmont

MA

Beverly High School

Beverly

MA

Another Course to College

Boston

MA

Boston College High School

Boston

MA

Boston Latin Academy

Boston

MA

Boston Latin School

Boston

MA

Boston University Academy

Boston

MA

Commonwealtlh School

Boston

MA

Madison Park Technical/Vocational High School

Boston

MA

Thayer Academy

Braintree

MA

Bridgewater-Raynham High School

Bridgewater

MA

Brighton High School

Brighton

MA

Mount St. Joseph Academy

Brighton

MA

Brockton High School

Brockton

MA

Burlington High School

Burlington

MA

Buckingham Browne & Nichols School

Cambridge

MA

The Cambridge Rindge and Latin School

Cambridge

MA

Canton High School

Canton

MA

Charlestown High School

Charletown

MA

Chelmsford High School

Chelmsford

MA

Beaver Country Day School

Chestnut Hill

MA

Chicopee High School

Chicopee

MA

Concord Academy

Concord

MA

Middlesex School

Concord

MA

Danvers High School

Danvers

MA

St John's Preparatory School

Danvers

MA

Dedham High School

Dedham

MA

Noble & Greenough School

Dedham

MA

Deerfield Academy

Deerfield

MA

Sandwich High School

East Sandwich

MA

Williston-Northampton School

Easthampton

MA

B. M. C. Durfee High School

Fall River

MA

Falmouth High School

Falmouth

MA

Framingham High School

Framingham

MA

Groton School

Groton

MA

Harwich High School

Harwich

MA

Barnstable High School

Hyannis

MA

Sacred Heart High School

Kingston

MA

Apponequet Regional High School

Lakeville

MA

Central Catholic High School

Lawrence

MA

Leominster High School

Leominster

MA

Longmeadow High School

Longmeadow

MA

Lowell High School

Lowell

MA

Ludlow High School

Ludlow

MA

Lynnfield High School

Lynnfield

MA

Manchester JR/SR High School

Manchester

MA

Marblehead High School

Marblehead

MA

Tabor Academy

Marion

MA

Medford High School

Medford

MA

Needham High School

Needham

MA

Newburyport High School

Newburyport

MA

Brooks School

North Andover

MA

North Andover High School

North Andover

MA

Oliver Ames High School

North Easton

MA

Northampton High School

Northampton

MA

Algonquin Regional High School

Northborough

MA

Northfield Mount Hermon School

Northfield

MA

Cape Cod Academy

Osterville

MA

Reading Memorial High School

Reading

MA

John D. O'Bryant

Roxbury

MA

Sharon High School

Sharon

MA

Shrewsbury High School

Shrewsbury

MA

St John's High School

Shrewsbury

MA

Somerset High School

Somerset

MA

Somerville High School

Somerville

MA

Hamilton-Wenham Regional High School

South Hamilton

MA

Pingree School

South Hamilton

MA

Dennis-Yarmouth Regional High School

South Yarmouth

MA

St Mark's School

Southborough

MA

Cathedral High School

Springfield

MA

The MacDuffie School

Springfield

MA

Stoneham High School

Stoneham

MA

Lincoln-Sudbury

Sudbury

MA

Lincoln-Sudbury Regional High School

Sudbury

MA

Swampscott High School

Swampscott

MA

Tewksbury Memoria High School

Tewskbury

MA

Masconomet Regional High School

Topsfield

MA

The Roxbury Latin School

W. Roxbury

MA

Our Lady of Nazareth

Wakefield

MA

Wakefield High School

Wakefield

MA

Waltham High School

Waltham

MA

Wayland High School

Wayland

MA

Wellesley High School

Wellesley

MA

Catholic Memorial High School

West Roxbury

MA

West Roxbury High School

West Roxbury

MA

Westfield High School

Westfield

MA

Westford Academy

Westford

MA

Weston High School

Weston

MA

Weston High School

Weston

MA

Westwood High School

Westwood

MA

Xaverian Brothers High School

Westwood

MA

Minnechaug Regional High School

Wilbraham

MA

Wilbraham Monson Academy

Wilbraham

MA

Woburn High School

Woburn

MA

Bancroft School

Worcester

MA

Doherty Memorial High School

Worcester

MA

Worcester Academy

Worcester

MA

Baltimore City College

Baltimore

MD

Baltimore Poly Institute

Baltimore

MD

Gilman School

Baltimore

MD

Pikesville High School

Baltimore

MD

Western High School

Baltimore

MD

Bethesda Chevy Chase High School

Bethesda

MD

The Holton Arms

Bethesda

MD

The Landon School

Bethesda

MD

Walt Whitman High School

Bethesda

MD

St. Paul's School for Boys

Brookland

MD

Suitland High School

Forestville

MD

Quince Orchard High School

Gaithersburg

MD

Watkins Mill High School

Gaithersburg

MD

Seneca Valley High School

Germantown

MD

Eleanor Roosevelt High School

Greenbelt

MD

Dematha Catholic High School

Hyattsville

MD

Georgetown Preparatory School

N. Bethesda

MD

Garrison Forest School

Owings Mills

MD

McDonogh School

Owings Mills

MD

Oxon Hill High School

Oxon Hill

MD

St. Andrew's Episcopal School

Potomac

MD

The Bullis School

Potomac

MD

Winston-Churchill High School

Potomac

MD

Charles E. Smith Jewish Day School

Rockville

MD

Colonel Zadok Magruder High School

Rockville

MD

Barrie School

Silver Spring

MD

John F. Kennedy High School

Silver Spring

MD

Montgomery Blair High School

Silver Spring

MD

Springbrook Senior High School

Silver Spring

MD

Brunswick High School

Brunswick

ME

Cape Elizabeth High School

Cape Elizabeth

ME

Falmouth High School

Falmouth

ME

Freeport High School

Freeport

ME

Deering High School

Portland

ME

Portland High School

Portland

ME

Waynflete High School

Portland

ME

Scarborough High School

Scarborough

ME

North Yarmouth Academy

Yarmouth

ME

Community High School

Ann Arbor

MI

Huron High School

Ann Arbor

MI

Pioneer High School

Ann Arbor

MI

Detroit Country Day School

Beverly Hills

MI

Seaholm High School

Birmingham

MI

Andover High School

Bloomfield Hills

MI

Cranbrook Kingswood Upper School

Bloomfield Hills

MI

International Academy

Bloomfield Hills

MI

Lahser High School

Bloomfield Hills

MI

Cass Technical High School

Detroit

MI

Renaissance High School

Detroit

MI

Grosse Pointe South High School

Grosse Pointe

MI

University Liggett School

Grosse Pointe Woods

MI

Edina High School

Edina

MN

Hopkins High School

Hopkins

MN

Breck School

Minneapolis

MN

St Paul Academy and Summit School

Minneapolis

MN

The Blake School

Minneapolis

MN

Minnetonka High School

Minnetonka

MN

Wayzata High School

Plymouth

MN

St Louis Park Sr High School

St Louis Park

MN

Central High School

St Paul

MN

Parkway Central High School

Chesterfield

MO

Clayton High School

Clayton

MO

Parkway North High School

Creve Coeur

MO

Hazelwood Central High School

Florissant

MO

Rockhurst High School

Kansas City

MO

The Barstow School

Kansas City

MO

The Pembroke Hill School

Kansas City

MO

John Burroughs School

St Louis

MO

Ladue Horton Watkins High School

St Louis

MO

Metro Academic & Classical HS

St Louis

MO

St Louis Country Day School/Mary Institute

St Louis

MO

St Louis Priory School

St Louis

MO

St Louis University High School

St Louis

MO

University City High School

University City

MO

Mississippi School for Math & Sciences

Columbus

MS

Jackson Preparatory School

Jackson

MS

Murrah High School

Jackson

MS

St. Andrew's Episcopal School

Ridgefield

MS

Billings Central Catholic High School

Billings

MT

Billings West High School

Billings

MT

Skyview High School

Billings

MT

Billings Senior High School

Billings,

MT

Cary Academy

Cary

NC

Cary Senior High School

Cary

NC

Chapel Hill High School

Chapel Hill

NC

Charlotte Country Day School

Charlotte

NC

Charlotte Latin School

Charlotte

NC

East Mecklenburg High School

Charlotte

NC

Myers Park High School

Charlotte

NC

Providence Day School

Charlotte

NC

Providence Senior High School

Charlotte

NC

West Charlotte High School

Charlotte

NC

West Forsyth Senior High School

Clemmons

NC

Carolina Friends School

Durham

NC

Charles E. Jordan High School

Durham

NC

Durham Academy Upper School

Durham

NC

North Carolina School of Science & Math

Durham

NC

Grimsley Senior High School

Greensboro

NC

Broughton High School

Raleigh

NC

J. O. Sanderson High School

Raleigh

NC

Ravenscroft School

Raleigh

NC

William G. Enloe High School

Raleigh

NC

Mount Tabor High School

Winston-Salem

NC

R. J. Reynolds Senior High School

Winston-Salem

NC

Central High School

Omaha

NE

Creighton Preparatory School

Omaha

NE

Harry A. Burke High School

Omaha

NE

Millard North High School

Omaha

NE

Millard South High School

Omaha

NE

St Paul's School

Concord

NH

Phillips Exeter Academy

Exeter

NH

Matawan Regional High School

Aberdeen

NJ

Bridgewater-Raritan Regional High School

Bridgewater

NJ

Chatham High School

Chatham

NJ

Soloman Schechter Day School

Cranford

NJ

Northern Valley Regional High School

Demarest

NJ

Manalapan High School

Englishtown

NJ

Freehold High School

Freehold

NJ

The Acad for the Advancement of Sci & Tech

Hackensack

NJ

Holmdel High School

Holmdel

NJ

Christian Brothers Academy

Lincroft

NJ

Newark Academy

Livingston

NJ

Pingry School

Martinsville

NJ

West Morris Mendham High School

Mendham

NJ

Montclair High School

Monclair

NJ

Parsippany Hills High School

Morris Plains

NJ

Delbarton School

Morristown

NJ

Morristown High School

Morristown

NJ

Morristown-Beard School

Morristown

NJ

Paramus High School

Paramus

NJ

Parsippany High School

Parsippany

NJ

Randolph High School

Randolph

NJ

Rumson Fair Haven Regional High School

Rumson

NJ

Rutgers Preparatory School

Somerset

NJ

Kent Place School

Summit

NJ

Oak Knoll School

Summit

NJ

Summit High School

Summit

NJ

Teaneck High School

Teaneck

NJ

Tenafly High School

Tenafly

NJ

Ranney School

Tinton Falls

NJ

West Orange High School

West Orange

NJ

Albuquerque Academy

Albuquerque

NM

Albuquerque High School

Albuquerque

NM

Sandia High School

Albuquerque

NM

Santa Fe Preparatory School

Santa Fe

NM

Sante Fe High School

Santa Fe

NM

St. Michael's High School

Santa Fe

NM

Bishop Gorman High School

Las Vegas

NV

Bonanza High School

Las Vegas

NV

Chaparral High School

Las Vegas

NV

Durango High School

Las Vegas

NV

The Meadows School

Las Vegas

NV

Bishop Manogue Catholic High School

Reno

NV

Reno High School

Reno

NV

Edward C. Reed High School

Sparks

NV

Sparks High School

Sparks

NV

Albany High School

Albany

NY

Amherst Central High School

Amherst

NY

Ardsley High School

Ardsley

NY

Byram Hills High School

Armonk

NY

Baldwin High School

Baldwin

NY

Benjamin N. Cardozo High School

Bayside

NY

Fox Lane High School

Bedford

NY

John F. Kennedy High School

Bellmore

NY

Briarcliff High School

Briarcliff Manor

NY

Cardinal Spellman High School

Bronx

NY

DeWitt Clinton High School

Bronx

NY

Fieldston School

Bronx

NY

Fordham Preparatory School

Bronx

NY

Herbert H. Lehman

Bronx

NY

Horace Mann School

Bronx

NY

John F. Kennedy High School

Bronx

NY

Riverdale Country School

Bronx

NY

The Bronx High School of Science

Bronx

NY

Bronxville High School

Bronxville

NY

Abraham Lincoln High School

Brooklyn

NY

Boys and Girls High School

Brooklyn

NY

Edward R. Murrow High School

Brooklyn

NY

Midwood High School

Brooklyn

NY

Poly Prep

Brooklyn

NY

Saint Anns School

Brooklyn

NY

The Berkeley Carroll School

Brooklyn

NY

City Honors School

Buffalo

NY

Hutchinson Central Technical HS

Buffalo

NY

Nichols School

Buffalo

NY

Lawrence High School

Cedarhurst

NY

Horace Greeley High School

Chappaqua

NY

Commack High School

Commack

NY

Bethlehem High School

Delmar

NY

Jamesville-DeWitt High School

DeWitt

NY

Manlius Pebble Hill School

DeWitt

NY

Half Hollow Hills HS East

Dix Hills

NY

Half Hollow Hills HS West

Dix Hills

NY

The Masters School

Dobbs Ferry

NY

Williamsville East High School

East Amherst

NY

Townsend Harris High School/Queens College

Flushing

NY

Forest Hills High School

Forest Hills

NY

Kew Forest School

Forest Hills

NY

Glen Cove High School

Glen Cove

NY

North Shore High School

Glen Head

NY

Great Neck South High School

Great Neck

NY

John L. Miller-Great Neck North HS

Great Neck

NY

Harrison High School

Harrison

NY

Hastings High School

Hastings-on-Hudson

NY

Holy Trinity Diocesan High School

Hicksville

NY

Irvington High School

Irvington

NY

Jamaica High School

Jamaica

NY

Jericho High School

Jericho

NY

John Jay High School

Katonah

NY

Shaker High School

Latham

NY

Friends Academy

Locust Valley

NY

Mamaroneck High School

Mamaroneck

NY

Manhasset High School

Manhasset

NY

Fayetteville-Manlius High School

Manlius

NY

Millbrook School

Millbrook

NY

Chaminade High School

Mineola

NY

Herricks High School

New Hyde Park

NY

New Rochelle High School

New Rochelle

NY

A. Philip Randolph High School

New York

NY

Browning School

New York

NY

Chapin School

New York

NY

Collegiate School

New York

NY

Columbia Grammar & Prep School

New York

NY

Convent of the Sacred Heart

New York

NY

Dominican Academy

New York

NY

F. H. LaGuardia High School

New York

NY

Frederick Douglass Academy

New York

NY

Friends Seminary

New York

NY

Friends Seminary

New York

NY

Hunter College High School

New York

NY

Martin Luther JR High School

New York

NY

Nightingale Bamford School

New York

NY

Ramaz School

New York

NY

Regis High School

New York

NY

Regis High School

New York

NY

School for the Physical City

New York

NY

Spence School

New York

NY

Stuyvesant High School

New York

NY

The Brearley School

New York

NY

The Dalton School

New York

NY

Trinity School

New York

NY

United Nations International School

New York

NY

Niskayuna High School

Niskayuna

NY

Northport High School

Northport

NY

The Wheatley School

Old Westbury

NY

Orchard Park High School

Orchard Park

NY

Ossining High School

Ossining

NY

Pelham Memorial High School

Pelham

NY

Pittsford Mendon High School

Pittsford

NY

Pittsford Sutherland High School

Pittsford

NY

Plainview-Old Bethpage JFK HS

Plainview

NY

Pleasantville High School

Pleasantville

NY

Port Chester High School

Port Chester

NY

Paul D. Schreiber High School

Port Washington

NY

Poughkeepsie Day School

Poughkeepsie

NY

Poughkeepsie High School

Poughkeepsie

NY

Brighton High School

Rochester

NY

East High School

Rochester

NY

Roslyn High School

Roslyn Heights

NY

Rye Country Day School

Rye

NY

Rye High School

Rye

NY

School of the Holy Child

Rye

NY

Blind Brook High School

Rye Brook

NY

Edgemont High School

Scarsdale

NY

Scarsdale High School

Scarsdale

NY

Ward Melville High School

Setauket

NY

Smithtown High School

Smithtown

NY

St Anthony's High School

So Huntington

NY

Monsignor Farrell High School

Staten Island

NY

Port Richmond High School

Staten Island

NY

St. Joseph Hill Academy

Staten Island

NY

Staten Island Academy

Staten Island

NY

Staten Island Technical High School

Staten Island

NY

Susan E. Wagner

Staten Island

NY

Tottenville High School

Staten Island

NY

Syosett High School

Syosett

NY

Christian Brothers Academy

Syracuse

NY

Wm Nottingham High School

Syracuse

NY

Hackley School

Tarrytown

NY

Roy C. Ketcham Sr High School

Wappingers Falls

NY

W.Tresper Clarke High School

Westbury

NY

White Plains High School

White Plains

NY

Williamsville North High School

Williamsville

NY

Williamsville South High School

Williamsville

NY

Beachwood High School

Beachwood

OH

Chagrin Falls High School

Chagrin Falls

OH

Cincinnati Country Day School

Cincinnati

OH

Princeton High School

Cincinnati

OH

Seven Hills School

Cincinnati

OH

St Xavier High School

Cincinnati

OH

Summit Country Day School

Cincinnati

OH

Sycamore High School

Cincinnati

OH

Walnut Hills High School

Cincinnati

OH

St Ignatius High School

Cleveland

OH

Beaumont High School

Cleveland Heights

OH

Cleveland Heights High School

Cleveland Heights

OH

Columbus School for Girls

Columbus

OH

The Miami Valley School

Dayton

OH

Columbus Academy

Gahanna

OH

Hawken School

Gates Mills

OH

Western Reserve Academy

Hudson

OH

University School

Hunting Valley

OH

Orange High School

Pepper Pike

OH

Hathaway Brown School

Shaker Heights

OH

Laurel School

Shaker Heights

OH

Shaker Heights High School

Shaker Heights

OH

Solon High School

Solon

OH

Wyoming High School

Wyoming

OH

Bishop McGuiness High School

Oklahoma City

OK

Casady School

Oklahoma City

OK

Classen School of Advanced Studies

Oklahoma City

OK

Oklahoma School for Science & Math

Oklahoma City

OK

Booker T. Washington High School

Tulsa

OK

Cascia Hall Preparatory School

Tulsa

OK

Holland Hall School

Tulsa

OK

Aloha High School

Beaverton

OR

Beaverton High School

Beaverton

OR

Sunset High School

Beaverton

OR

Lake Oswego High School

Lake Oswego

OR

Lakeridge High School

Lake Oswego

OR

Gatlin Gabel Upper School

Portland

OR

Jesuit High School

Portland

OR

Lincoln High School

Portland

OR

Oregon Episcopal School

Portland

OR

Woodrow Wilson High School

Portland

OR

McKay High School

Salem

OR

South Salem High School

Salem

OR

Sprague High School

Salem

OR

Tigard Senior High School

Tigard

OR

Tualatin High School

Tualatin

OR

Bethel Park Senior High School

Bethel Park

PA

The Baldwin School

Bryn Mawr

PA

The Shipley School

Bryn Mawr

PA

Keystone Oaks High School

Dormont

PA

Downingtown Senior High School

Downington

PA

Germantown Academy

Fort Washington

PA

Upper Dublin High School

Fort Washington

PA

Central Dauphin East Sr High School

Harrisburg

PA

Susquehanna Township High School

Harrisburg

PA

Hershey High School

Hershey

PA

Milton Hershey School

Hershey

PA

Unionville High School

Kenneth Square

PA

Lancaster Country Day School

Lancaster

PA

Manheim Township

Lancaster

PA

Peters Township High School

McMurray

PA

The Mercersburg Academy

Mercersburg

PA

Moon Area High School

Moon Township

PA

Marple Newton High School

Newton Square

PA

George School

Newtown

PA

Central High School

Philadelphia

PA

Germantown Friends School

Philadelphia

PA

J. R. Masterman Lab & Demonstration School

Philadelphia

PA

Philadelphia High School for Girls

Philadelphia

PA

William Penn Charter

Philadelphia

PA

Phoenixville Area High School

Phoenixville

PA

Ellis School

Pittsburgh

PA

Fox Chapel Area High School

Pittsburgh

PA

Mount Lebanon High School

Pittsburgh

PA

Shady Side Academy

Pittsburgh

PA

Taylor Allderdice High School

Pittsburgh

PA

Winchester Thurston High School

Pittsburgh

PA

The Hill School

Pottstown

PA

Radnor High School

Radnor

PA

Sewickley Academy

Sewickley

PA

Waynesburg Central

Waynesburg

PA

Westtown School

Westtown

PA

North Alleghey

Wexford

PA

Cheltenham High School

Wyncote

PA

Wyomissing Area High School

Wyomissing

PA

York Suburban High School

York

PA

Cranston High School West

Cranston

RI

East Greenwich High School

East Greenwich

RI

St. George's School

Newport

RI

North Kingstown Senior High School

North Kingstown

RI

Portsmouth Abbey School

Portsmouth

RI

Classical High School

Providence

RI

Moses Brown School

Providence

RI

Wheeler School

Providence

RI

South Kingston High School

Wakefield

RI

Toll Gate High School

Warwick

RI

Dreher High School

Columbia

SC

Heathwood Hall Episcopal School

Columbia

SC

Irmo High School

Columbia

SC

Spring Valley High School

Columbia

SC

Webb School

Bell Buckle

TN

Baylor School

Chattanooga

TN

Chattanooga School of A & S

Chattanooga

TN

Girls Preparatory School

Chattanooga

TN

McCallie School

Chattanooga

TN

Germantown High School

Germantown

TN

Christian Brothers High School

Memphis

TN

Memphis University School

Memphis

TN

St. Mary's Episcopal School

Memphis

TN

Harpeth Hall High School

Nashville

TN

Hillsboro High School

Nashville

TN

Hume Fogg Academic High School

Nashville

TN

John Overton Comprehensive High School

Nashville

TN

Martin Luther King Jr. Magnet School

Nashville

TN

Montgomery Bell Academy

Nashville

TN

University School of Nashville

Nashville

TN

Arlington High School

Arlington

TX

Lamar High School

Arlington

TX

Anderson High School

Austin

TX

St. Stephen's Episcopal School

Austin

TX

Westlake High School

Austin

TX

Bellaire Senior High School

Bellaire

TX

Episcopal High School

Bellaire

TX

Gladys Porter High School

Brownsville

TX

James Pace High School

Brownsville

TX

St. Joseph Academy

Brownsville

TX

Incarnate Word Academy

Corpus Christi

TX

Mary Carroll High School

Corpus Christi

TX

Roy Miller Senior High School

Corpus Christi

TX

W. B. Ray High School

Corpus Christi

TX

Episcopal School of Dallas

Dallas

TX

Greenhill School

Dallas

TX

Highland Park High School

Dallas

TX

Hockaday School

Dallas

TX

Jesuit College Preparatory School

Dallas

TX

St. Mark's School

Dallas

TX

Talented & Gifted Magnet High School

Dallas

TX

Ursuline Academy

Dallas

TX

Cathedral High School

El Paso

TX

Coronado High School

El Paso

TX

Loretto Academy High School

El Paso

TX

Fort Worth Country Day School

Fort Worth

TX

Nolan Catholic High School

Fort Worth

TX

Northside High School

Fort Worth

TX

Trinity Valley School

Fort Worth

TX

Booker T. Washington Senior High School

Houston

TX

High School of Performing & Visual Arts

Houston

TX

Kinkaid School

Houston

TX

Mount Carmel High School

Houston

TX

St. Agnes Academy

Houston

TX

St. John's School

Houston

TX

St. Thomas Episcopal School

Houston

TX

The Awty International School

Houston

TX

Science Academy of South Texas

Mercedes

TX

South Texas HS for Health Professions

Mercedes

TX

Alamo Heights High School

San Antonio

TX

Central Catholic Marianist High School

San Antonio

TX

Douglas MacArthur High School

San Antonio

TX

Incarnate Word High School

San Antonio

TX

Keystone School

San Antonio

TX

Robert E. Lee High School

San Antonio

TX

St. Mary's Hall School

San Antonio

TX

Tom Clark High School

San Antonio

TX

The John Cooper School

The Woodlands

TX

East High School

Salt Lake City

UT

Judge Memorial Catholic High School

Salt Lake City

UT

Rowland Hall-St. Mark's School

Salt Lake City

UT

West High School

Salt Lake City

UT

The Waterford School

Sandy

UT

Bishop Ireton High School

Alexandria

VA

Episcopal High School

Alexandria

VA

St. Stephen's & St. Agnes

Alexandria

VA

T. C. Williams High School

Alexandria

VA

Thomas Jefferson High School

Alexandria

VA

Yorktown High School

Arlington

VA

Lake Braddock Secondary School

Burke

VA

Charlottesville High School

Charlottesville

VA

St. Anne's-Belfield School

Charlottesville

VA

Tandem School

Charlottesville

VA

Western Albermarle High School

Crozet

VA

W. T. Woodson High School

Fairfax

VA

George Marshall High School

Falls Church

VA

George Mason JR/SR High School

Falls Church

VA

Madeira School

Greenway

VA

Langley High School

McLean

VA

McLean High School

McLean

VA

Potomac School

McLean

VA

Clover Hill High School

Midlothian

VA

Midlothian High School

Midlothian

VA

Maury High School

Norfolk

VA

Norfolk Academy

Norfolk

VA

South Lakes High School

Reston

VA

St. Catherine's School

Richmond

VA

The Collegiate Schools

Richmond

VA

James Madison High School

Vienna

VA

Oakton High School

Vienna

VA

First Colonial High School

Virginia Beach

VA

Bainbridge High School

Bainbridge Island

WA

Forest Ridge School

Bellevue

WA

Interlake High School

Bellevue

WA

Newport High School

Bellevue

WA

Sammamish High School

Bellevue

WA

Redmond High School

Redmond

WA

The Overlake School

Redmond

WA

Holy Name Academy

Seattle

WA

James A. Garfield High School

Seattle

WA

Lakeside School

Seattle

WA

Roosevelt High School

Seattle

WA

Seattle Preparatory School

Seattle

WA

Shorewood High School

Seattle

WA

The Bush School

Seattle

WA

The Northwest School

Seattle

WA

University Preparatory Academy

Seattle

WA

Charles Wright Academy

Tacoma

WA

Nicolet High School

Glendale

WI

Homestead High School

Mequon

WI

Marquette University High School

Milwaukee

WI

Rufus King High School

Milwaukee

WI

Central High School

Cheyenne

WY

Cheyenne East High School

Cheyenne

WY

Laramie Senior High School

Laramie

WY





Appendix 2
Appendix 2

Appendix 2: High Schools, by Country and Territory, Tufts Visits

Bialik High School

Cote St Luc

CANADA

Herzliah High School

Montreal

CANADA

Lower Canada College

Montreal

CANADA

Marianopolis College

Montreal

CANADA

St George's School

Montreal

CANADA

Appleby College

Oakville

CANADA

Dawson College

Quebec

CANADA

Bishop Strachan School

Toronto

CANADA

Branksome Hall

Toronto

CANADA

Havergal College

Toronto

CANADA

Northern Secondary School

Toronto

CANADA

St Clement's School

Toronto

CANADA

The University of Toronto School

Toronto

CANADA

Upper Canada College

Toronto

CANADA

Crofton House School

Vancouver BC

CANADA

Magee Secondary School

Vancouver BC

CANADA

Point Grey Secondary School

Vancouver BC

CANADA

Prince of Wales

Vancouver BC

CANADA

St. George's School

Vancouver BC

CANADA

York House School

Vancouver BC

CANADA

Collingwood School

West Vancouver BC

CANADA

The Study

Westmount

CANADA

American School in London

London

ENGLAND

St Paul's Boys School

London

ENGLAND

St Paul's Girls School

London

ENGLAND

Harrow School

Middlesex

ENGLAND

American School of Paris

Cedex

FRANCE

Lycee International of St Germaine-en-Laye

Cedex

FRANCE

Ecole Active Bilingue Jeannine Manuel

Paris

FRANCE

The Moraitis School

Athens

GREECE

Baldwin School of Puerto Rico

Bayamon

PR

Antilles High School

Fort Buchanan

PR

Academia San Jose High School

Guaynabo

PR

American Military Academy

Guaynabo

PR

Colegio Puertorriqueno de Ninas

Guaynabo

PR

Academia del Perpetuo Socorro

Miramar

PR

Academia Maria Reina

Rio Piedras

PR

Colegio San Ignacio de Loyola

Rio Piedras

PR

Cupeville School

Rio Piedras

PR

Caribbean Preparatory High School

San Juan

PR

Robinson School

Santurce

PR

St. John's School

Santurce

PR

Aiglon College

Chessieres-Villars

SWITZERLAND

International School of Geneva

Geneva

SWITZERLAND

Uskudar American Academy

Baglarbasi-Istanbul

TURKEY

Robert College

Istanbul

TURKEY

Koc School

Pendik-Istanbul

TURKEY

Good Hope School

St. Croix

VI

St. Croix Central High School

St. Croix

VI

St. Croix Country Day School

St. Croix

VI

St. Joseph High School

St. Croix

VI

All Saints Cathedral High School

St. Thomas

VI

Charlotte Amalie High School

St. Thomas

VI

Sts. Peter & Paul High School

St. Thomas

VI





Appendix 3
Appendix 3

Appendix 3: Cities in Which Tufts Holds Student/Parent Meetings

La Jolla

CA

Los Angeles

CA

Newport Beach

CA

Oakland

CA

Ojai

CA

Palo Alto

CA

Denver

CO

Darien

CT

Groton

CT

Hamden

CT

West Hartford

CT

Windsor

CT

Washington

DC

Middletown

DE

Fort Lauderdale

FL

Miami

FL

Atlanta

GA

Honolulu

HI

New Orleans

LA

Mashpee

MA

Baltimore

MD

Rockville

MD

Durham

NC

Englewood

NJ

Montville

NJ

Princeton

NJ

Brooklyn

NY

New York

NY

Portland

OR

Philadelphia

PA

Pittsburgh

PA

Providence

RI

Alamo Heights

TX

Dallas

TX

Houston

TX

San Antonio

TX

Richmond

VA

Mercer Island

WA

Seattle

WA

   

Vancouver BC

CANADA

Hong Kong

CHINA

Seoul

KOREA

Guaynabo

PR

Singapore

SINGAPORE

Taipei

TAIWAN

St. Thomas

VI

   





REPORT OF THE OVERSIGHT PANEL
REPORT OF THE OVERSIGHT PANEL
ON THE IMPLEMENTATION
OF TASK FORCE ON RACE RECOMMENDATIONS






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