Compositional variations on the Moon’s surface

Compositional variations on the Moon’s surface

Fig. 5.23 . This mosaic of images, taken through three spectral filters, shows exaggerated false-color differences in reflected sunlight in order to specify composition differences on the lunar surface. The image shows volcanic flows with relatively high titanium content (blue), volcanic flows that are low in titanium but rich in iron and magnesium (green, yellow and light orange), and heavily cratered highlands that are typically poor in titanium, iron and magnesium (pink and red). In this view, taken by Galileo on 7 December 1992, bright pink highlands surround the lava-filled Crisium impact basin (bottom) and the dark blue Mare Tranquillitatis (left) is richer in titanium than the green and orange maria above it. The youngest craters have prominent blue rays extending from them. (Courtesy of NASA/JPL.)

Copyright 2010, Professor Kenneth R. Lang, Tufts University