7. Venus: The veiled planet

Fig. 7.1.
The phases of Venus
Fig. 7.2.
Cloud tops of Venus
Fig. 7.3.a
Surface rocks on Venus
Fig. 7.3.b
Surface rocks on Venus
Fig. 7.4.
Wind speeds and cloud layers of Venus
Fig. 7.5.
Wind blows material ejected from crater on Venus
Fig. 7.6.
Hadley cells in the atmosphere of Venus
Fig. 7.7.
South polar vortex at Venus
Fig. 7.8.
Solar wind flows around Venus
Fig. 7.9.
Venus slowly loses some atmosphere
Fig. 7.10.
Surface terrain of Venus
Fig. 7.11.
Surface elevations for Earth, Venus and Mars
Fig. 7.12.
Major surface features on Venus
Fig. 7.13.
Lava flows
Fig. 7.14.
Stuart Crater
Fig. 7.15.
Sri Mons and Gula Mons
Fig. 7.16.
Sapas Mons
Fig. 7.17.
Mountain ranges on Venus
Fig. 7.18.
Bereghinya Planitia
Fig. 7.19.
Atla Regio
Fig. 7.20.
Arachnoids
Fig. 7.21.
Fotla Corona
Fig. 7.22.
Volcanic pancake domes
Fig. 7.23.
Tessera
Fig. 7.24.
Vertical motions on Venus
Fig. 7.25.
Impact craters, terrain type, and terrain ages on Venus
Fig. 7.26.summary
Summary Diagram
Fig. 7.1.
Fig7_1 Prime Meridian
Fig. 7.2.
Fig7_2 Celestial coords
Fig. 7.3.
Fig7_3 Precession
Fig. 7.4.
Fig7_4 Annual parallax
Fig. 7.5.
Fig7_5 Proxima Centauri
Fig. 7.6.
Fig7_6 VY Canis Majoris
Fig. 7.7.
Fig7_7 The Flames of Betelegeuse
Fig. 7.8.
Fig7_8Alpha_Centauri_and_southerncross_cc.jpg
Fig. 7.9.
Fig7_9 Double stars
Fig. 7.10.
Fig7_10 Stellar mass luminosity relation
Fig. 7.11.
Fig7_11 A star moves
Fig. 7.12.
Fig7_12 Globular star cluster M80
Fig. 7.13.
Fig7_13 Faint stars globular cluster
Fig. 7.14.
Fig7_14 Globular star cluster NGC6934
Fig. 7.15.
FIg7_15 Open Cluster
Fig. 7.16.
Fig7_16 Pleiades Open Star Cluster
Fig. 7.17.
FIG7_17 Runaway star

Copyright 2010, Professor Kenneth R. Lang, Tufts University