6. Mercury: a battered world

Fig. 6.1.
Maximum elongation
Fig. 6.2.
Arecibo observatory
Fig. 6.3.
Radar probes of Mercury
Fig. 6.4.
Doppler effect
Fig. 6.5.
The days are long on Mercury
Fig. 6.6.a
Mercury’s south pole
Fig. 6.6.b
Mercury’s south pole
Fig. 6.7.
Moon-like surface of Mercury
Fig. 6.8.
Previously unseen side of Mercury
Fig. 6.9.
Shallow craters on Mercury
Fig. 6.10.
Bright rayed crater on Mercury
Fig. 6.11.
Dark halo craters on Mercury
Fig. 6.12.
Intercrater plains on Mercury
Fig. 6.13.
Smooth plains on Mercury
Fig. 6.14.
Rembrandt impact basin
Fig. 6.15.
Volcanic activity on Mercury
Fig. 6.16.
Santa Maria rupes
Fig. 6.17.
Radius, mass density and interior structure of terrestrial bodies
Fig. 6.18.
Mercury's magnetic field and large core
Fig. 6.19.
Precession of Mercury's perihelion
Fig. 6.20.
Space curvature
Fig. 6.21.summary
Summary Diagram
Fig. 6.1.
Fig6_1 Eclipse corona
Fig. 6.2.
Fig6_2 Sunspot group
Fig. 6.3.
Fig6_3 Solar magnetic activity cycle
Fig. 6.4.
Fig6_4 Winding up the field
Fig. 6.5.
Fig6_5 Magnetic Loops
Fig. 6.6.
Fig6_6 Coronal loops
Fig. 6.7.
Fig6_7 Magnetic and gas pressure
Fig. 6.8.
Fig6_8 Sun in X-rays
Fig. 6.9.
Fig6_9 Far Magnetic Fields
Fig. 6.10.
Fig6_10 Solar flare model
Fig. 6.11.
Fig6_11 A huge coronal mass ejection
Fig. 6.12.
Fig6_12 Magnetosphere
Fig. 6.13.
Fig6_13 Bastille Day Flare (left)
Fig. 6.13.
Fig6_13 Bastille Day Flare (right)
Fig. 6.14.
Fig6_14 Magneatic spiral
Fig. 6.15.
Fig6_15 Magnetic Cloud

Copyright 2010, Professor Kenneth R. Lang, Tufts University