People

Current Fellows

Faculty Fellows


Ina Baghdiantz McCabe
Professor
Department of Art History

Ina Baghdiantz McCabe came to Tufts in 1998, after a decade of teaching, to be the first holder of the Darakjian and Jafarian Chair, an endowed chair in Armenian history established by a Tufts alumna. Her publications focus on diaspora and transregional economic and intellectual exchanges within Eurasia in the early modern period. Her work has been supported by several fellowships, the last was at the Radcliffe Institute at Harvard. At Tufts she received the Faculty Research Awards Committee's Distinguished Scholar Award in May 2008. She is a CHAT fellow for the 2018-19 academic year.


Charles Inouye
Professor
Department of International Literary and Cultural Studies

Charles Shiro Inouye is a Professor of Japanese Literature and Visual Culture at Tufts. He will be finishing a book, Archipelago—Figurality and the Development of Modern Consciousness, which is a semiotic analysis of modern expression—and beginning another—Anima, a Haiku Journey into the Life of Things. His most recent publications include The End of the World, Plan B (Greg Kofford, 2016), A Tokyo Anthology: Literature from Japan's Modern Capital, 1850-1910 (University of Hawaii, 2017), and Mormon Zen—Learning to Rake (forthcoming).


Jeremy Melius
Assistant Professor
Department of Art and Art History

Jeremy Melius is an art historian specializing in the study of modern art and art writing. As a Faculty Fellow, he is at work on a new project, tentatively entitled "Ruskin and Art History," concerned with the Victorian critic's fraught relation to the past, present, and future of the study of the historical dimensions of visual and material culture. Through Ruskin, it seeks to shed new light on the nineteenth century's fixation on the materiality of history, and aims to develop out of his thought a mode of art writing adequate to the historical complexities of the present.


Postdoctoral and Doctoral Fellows


Hossein Ayazi
Postdoctoral Fellow

Hossein Ayazi received his PhD in Society and Environment from the University of California, Berkeley in 2018. His current book project, Race, Containment, and the Settler-Imperial Politics of the Green Revolution, traces how the U.S.-led international capital-intensive agricultural research, technology, and education transfer initiatives that were designed to combat hunger and contain civil unrest during the early Cold War—later named the "Green Revolution"—innovated upon early-twentieth century U.S. settler colonial and anti-Black forms of subjection, administration, and governance. Specifically, Hossein names the Green Revolution as an exercise in the risk management of racial capitalism during a period of great social upheaval: when overlapping, internationalized anticolonial and civil rights movements named the limits of racial democracy and risked undercutting postwar U.S. state power and transnational capitalism. He argues that the mid-twentieth century technical, scientific, and education cooperation efforts, and paired innovations in governance and administration, elaborated upon U.S. state-led and capital-intensive efforts to cultivate forms of Native and Black market agrarianisms earlier in the century. Hossein's research has been published in Qui Parle: Critical Humanities and Social Sciences and in Comparative American Studies. As a research follow and current Project Policy Analyst with the Haas Institute for a Fair and Inclusive Society at the University of California, Berkeley, Hossein has also co-authored reports on U.S. and global food systems and agri-environmental policy, neoliberalism and international trade, and global dynamics of forced migration.


Sumayya Kassamali
Postdoctoral Fellow

Sumayya Kassamali is an anthropologist who works on urban violence and migration in the Middle East. She received her PhD from Columbia University in 2017 and was previously a postdoctoral fellow at the Mahindra Humanities Center at Harvard University. Her dissertation work examined the experiences of African and Asian domestic workers in Beirut, Lebanon in order to think ethnographically about race and racism in the Arab world. Her additional research interests lie in global jihad, the iconographies of martyrdom, and Shi'i aesthetics. 



Yizhou Huang
Doctoral Candidate
Department of Drama and Dance

Yizhou Huang

Yizhou Huang is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Drama and Dance. Her dissertation examines Shanghai theatre between two world wars. She received her B.A. in English literature from Beijing Foreign Studies University in 2013 and her M.A. in Drama from Tufts University in 2016. Her research interests include political theatre, contemporary Chinese theatre, and intercultural performance between China and the West. Before coming to Tufts, she interned at National Center for the Performing Arts in Beijing.


Seohyon Jung
Doctoral Candidate
Department of English

Seohyon Jung

Seohyon Jung earned her B.A. and M.A. in English Literature from Seoul National University. She is currently working on her dissertation project, titled "Motherless Britain: Contested Motherhood and the Development of British Colonialisms, 1790-1810," which examines material and ideological relationships between late eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century British literary discourse about motherhood and the contemporaneous development of the logic supporting colonial practices. Her research interests include late 18th- and 19th-century British literature and culture, the history and theory of the novel, the idea of motherhood, women's labor, pedagogy, and translation.