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Faculty & Research



Contact Info:
Department of Biology
Tufts University
200 Boston Ave., Suite 4700
Medford, MA 02155

Tel: 617.627.4828
Fax: 617.627.0309
Email Dr. Kim

Publications

Jane C. Kim
Research Assistant Professor
Genetics and Molecular Biology

Education

2010 – 2015 TEACRS Postdoctoral Fellow, Tufts University
2004 – 2010 Ph.D., Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
2000 – 2004 B.S., Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology, Yale University

Selected Honors and Awards

Chair, 2016 Gordon Research Seminar on DNA Damage, Mutation & Cancer
Natalie F. Zucker Research Grant
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Course Scholarship
Phi Beta Kappa, Alpha of Connecticut at Yale chapter

Research Interests

My scientific research interests are broadly centered on understanding how cells copy their genetic material, drawing on molecular and cell biology, genetics, and genomics as experimental approaches. Precise regulation and accuracy of this process are critical in preventing genome instability associated with cancer and other human diseases. For my PhD research, I investigated how initiation of DNA replication is regulated using the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster as a model organism and uncovered diverse, and previously undescribed, developmental strategies controlling initiation of DNA replication.

I am currently investigating repetitive DNA elements called microsatellites. These are abundant in the human genome, but their normal functions are not well understood. However, there is a class of genetic diseases, including Huntington’s disease and myotonic dystrophy, that is caused when a normally short tract of CAG trinucleotide repeats expands, or increases the number of repeat units, to much longer lengths. I have developed a novel experimental system in budding yeast to analyze large-scale CAG repeat expansions, enabling powerful analysis of their genetic control.

I believe that engaging in authentic research opportunities is one of the most effective modes of learning. Additionally, expanding research opportunities to a diverse student population is an important value to me. To this end, I have mentored over a dozen undergraduate students in my time at Tufts through the REU program, Summer Scholars, and mentored research projects for academic credit. In addition, I taught Genetics lecture and laboratory at Bunker Hill Community College as part of the TEACRS program. In both the classroom and research lab, I am excited to see students develop as scientific thinkers and practitioners.


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